Living in the Past, Present, or Future?

We older folks are often accused of living in the past and thinking everything back then was so much better than now. I’m not one of them.

As a few of you may recall from a former blog post, I don’t seem to have nearly as many memories of my childhood and teen years as adults typically have. I attribute that, whether correctly or not, to the acute viral encephalitis that could have killed me or left me in a vegetative state, but from which God restored me to a reasonable normal condition. But one that was somewhat fuzzy about the past.

That was in the eighth grade. I wouldn’t want to relive that part of my past.

College years were fine, but not exciting. Neither was my teaching career or my years at the Maryland State Job Service as a counselor/interviewer.

Life grew more meaningful when I took some computer programming courses and went to work at the International Mission Board. Working behind the scenes of something important gave me a feeling of significance I’d never experienced before. I had some wonderful successes before I started having problems with a new job assignment.

And then I got downsized after almost nineteen years.

Those memories aren’t things to dwell on. Despite the many good moments, I’ll never think of those years as “the good old days.”

 

What about the future?

As a Christian, I’m not afraid of death, although I would love to have the assurance that the process of dying would be quick and painless…and that my wife, Kathleen, and I would die at the same time so neither of us would have to face life without the other.

But the future–at least the part where I’m still alive on earth–isn’t knowable.

I don’t have many dreams about what I’d like the future to hold. Yes, of course I’d like for my novels–some of them, anyhow–to suddenly take off and start selling. Not because I care about the income, but because I want to know they’re blessing and entertaining readers.

I can’t help wishing and hoping (yes, and praying, too) that at least one of my songs will end up in a collection of praise and worship songs. Maybe even in a hymn book!

I hate to admit it, but when I’m expecting a shipment of some tiny something-or-other from Amazon, you’d almost think I was a little kid waiting for his parents to wake up on Christmas morning so he can start opening presents.

That’s a bit weird, maybe, but that’s how I am. My future on earth doesn’t promise to be the best time of my life. Especially as my body falls apart a little more year by year. I hope and pray my mind doesn’t do the same thing.

And the present?

That leaves the present. I’ve ended up with two skills–two things I love using–I’m not able to use the way I’d like to. Yes, I’ll keep working on developing them even more, but knowing I may be doing it only for my own benefit is discouraging.

Until yesterday–or was it this morning?–I was super-frustrated at what I perceived as my lack of usefulness. I couldn’t see myself accomplishing anything, and that thought was more depressing than I’d like to think about.

It’s no wonder. Many–maybe most–of the authors I know have more book ideas running through their heads than they can use in a lifetime. I don’t.

I’d started working on a sequel to one of my teen books. I’d even designed a cover for it and written a few chapters.

But I just couldn’t get excited about it and haven’t been able to proceed. It’s not a matter of writer’s block, but of questioning whether this was what I should be doing.

You can better understand now why I was feeling useless and insignificant, at least in the areas of my life that are so important.

But I prayed, and I kept praying, and God led me back to an idea I had begun considering in January of this year. Why I set it aside then, I couldn’t tell you.

But I’ve fallen in love with it. Working on it won’t restore my losses in other areas, but I feel good again. Great!

Living in the present seems to work best, as long as I don’t totally forget the past or fail to consider the future. And when today’s present becomes the past, I’ll find something in that future time to make that present time the best.

Where do you live–past, present, or future? How about leaving a comment?

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

P.S. Here’s the new cover and title for what was previously published as PROJECT MUFFINTOP.

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How Will You Be Remembered?

What probably sticks out the most in my mind from last Saturday’s luncheon for people who graduated from Frostburg State University fifty years ago wasn’t seeing a few familiar people, but having a time of remembrance for former classmates who’ve passed away.

 

A good-sized list of those stood on a table at one end of the room, and co-master of ceremonies Pat Garrett went through that list name by name as part of the luncheon’s events. He told whatever he knew about each person and asked attendees to share anything they knew or remembered about the deceased.

A number of the deceased were remembered only as having been good people–or nice ones. But those were still positive memories.

Many of the deceased either weren’t commented on at all, however. Whether they had truly been that inconspicuous during their college years or attendees didn’t feel it was right to say bad things about them, I couldn’t say.

I can’t help being curious. Once I’ve passed away, what will people at future reunions remember about me? I wasn’t an athlete. I wasn’t in any activities except the Baptist Student Union. (If any of my friends from the BSU came to the reunion, I didn’t see them.) I did play my guitar and sing at the Leaves of Grass coffee house on Friday nights, but that probably wasn’t overly memorable, either.

Hmm.

Death for a Christian is a good thing, not something to dread or regret. We believe we’ll be in a better place. Such a perfect place it makes the best earth has to offer seem trivial and worthless.

But that doesn’t mean we don’t want to be remembered–and hopefully in a good way. I don’t know about other peoples’ legacies, but I hope and pray that my novels and songs (maybe even some of my blog posts) will prove to be a worthy legacy, even if they’re not overly popular.

Success with the masses now or later isn’t the important thing. Blessing lives–eve a few lives–is, even if people don’t remember my name.

Twenty-five years ago I wrote a song called “What Will You Leave Behind?” Several years ago I did a video selfie of myself playing and singing that song. I keep the DVD in a lock box under the bed…to be played at my funeral, which I hope won’t be anytime soon.

The lyrics go like this:

When you die, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Precious memories for your friends and family
Or relief that you’re no longer there?
Will the faith you’ve shared bring them comfort
Or your hopelessness cause them more grief?
When you die, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

When you pass away, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Will your words continue to encourage
Or the harm they’ve engendered linger on?
Do your teachings tell of God’s Kingdom
While your actions point the other way?
When you pass away, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

When you depart this life, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Will the good you’ve planted bloom like flowers
Or the problems you’ve sown spread like weeds?
Is your life well invested in others
Or will your influence die at your death?
When you depart this life, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

How I hope I will be remembered for the good. What about you? How do you think you’ll be remembered?

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Seniors on the Move: Why Your Loved One Should Join Adult Swimming Lessons (conclusion)

Thanks once more to Chris H of backyardpoolsuperstore.com for this interesting and worthwhile guest post article. If you missed part one, you’ll want to go back and read it to get the complete picture.

 

Increasing Flexibility

Stretching and extending the body can be a challenge as we get older. Joints and limbs don’t seem to stretch as far as they used to after a certain age. But seniors can get in touch with their bodies and increase their flexibility by participating in swimming lessons and classes for other water-based exercises. Swimming forces you to use the body in new ways as you kick and extend your limbs in all different directions. Learning a new stroke or how to hold their bodies in the water can lead to some surprising results as seniors learn how to be more comfortable and confident in the water. With the help and support of a class, elderly people can learn from their mistakes and discover how to use their body in new ways without worrying about injuring themselves.

Improving Balance and Control

As we get older, we tend to struggle with balance issues and tend to be more prone to slips and falls. Just one wrong turn can lead to a lifetime of pain if the person isn’t careful. But instead of watching your loved one’s physical condition worsen over time, you can help them improve their balance and control by enrolling them in adult swimming classes.

Learning a new stroke and helping them perfect their swimming abilities shows them how to steady themselves in the water. They’ll learn to work their core muscles as they move through the water, which they can use to help them stay upright as they climb the stairs, get in and out of the car and other accident-prone situations where older adults might be at risk of suffering a fall. They’ll be more independent, and you won’t have to worry about them injuring themselves when you’re not around to supervise.

Staying Social

Making friends can be difficult as we get older. If your loved one is feeling lonely and isolated from the community, enrolling them in adult swimming classes might be just what they’re looking for. They can meet other members of the community, learn a new skill in a group setting and create shared experiences with people they might not have gotten to know otherwise. Staying social also helps improve the person’s mood, physical health and cognitive abilities, so they can continue developing these relationships after the class ends. Getting old is so much easier when your loved one can depend on the love and support of their community.

Reducing Chronic Illness

Seniors can experience all kinds of chronic illnesses later in life, including arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. That’s why water-based exercises like swimming can be so beneficial. These exercises can reduce their pain and improve their functionality without worsening their symptoms. Overall, this improves your loved one’s overall quality of life, helping them ward off the unpleasant aspects of aging like chronic pain, fatigue and lack of independence.

If you’re looking for a surefire way to boost your loved one’s mood, physical abilities and reduce their chronic pain, look no further than adult swimming classes. Trying something new and learning a new skill can be difficult for some older individuals, but if they stick with it, it’s only a matter of time before they see the benefits.

 ~*~

Thanks again to Chris for this interesting and worthwhile guest post. I hope this won’t be the last of Chris’s articles we can use.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Elvis Is Still Alive…Kind of


When the church my father was pastoring gave us our first stereo, I was thrilled! Excited!

Sometime previously, I’d started listening to a radio station that played pop music–something I wouldn’t have heard at home otherwise because my parents were big on classical music (on public radio, probably)–and never missed listening to the top thirty countdown on Sunday afternoons.

So, with the gift of the stereo, I was all set to buy some of my favorite 45s. Thanks to a timely birthday party, I had five dollars to spend at an actual record shop. Yes, I bought Sheb Wooley’s “Purple People Eater” and the Everly Brothers’ “Bird Dog,” but I HAD to have Elvis’s “Hard-Headed Woman,” which I still remember so fondly I refer to it on the first page of Do I Ever, one of my quirky romantic novels.

That wasn’t the last of Elvis’s records I bought over the years.

I was no longer much of a fan at the time of his death forty-one years ago however; I preferred his older songs. Honestly, I was probably badly disillusioned at the condition he’d ended up in and at the circumstances of his death.

But several things started working on my mind–and on my point of view. I had a couple of Elvis’s greatest hits albums, and I enjoyed listening to them occasionally.

But I also had at least an in-law relationship with Stan Kesler, who wrote Elvis’s first nationally popular song, “I Forgot to Remember to Forget.” He’s the father of one of my wife’s sisters-in-law, and he’s just the nicest ninety-year-old you could ever hope to meet in spite of bad health, poor vision, and equally poor hearing. And he’d worked at Sun Studio, where Elvis got his start.

How could I possibly not at least have some interest in Elvis because of Stan?

I’d heard the tale years earlier from a co-worker, Sharon, who used to live in Memphis and babysit for a local songwriter. She sent me this reminder of the circumstances a few years ago:

” I met Elvis when I was babysitting for one of his song writers, Stan Kesler (I Forgot to Remember to Forget), in the late 1950’s. He came to the door dressed in all black with the collar of his shirt flipped up and hair in his eyes. He wanted to pick up some music Stan had for him. I made him stand on the front porch while I called Stan to verify, also to get my ‘senses’ back. Elvis was so impressed that I made him stay on the porch that he invited me to dinner at Graceland. I was picked up in a pink Cadillac. After dinner, we looked at photo albums in the music room.”

Sharon’s encounter with Elvis–even her original telling of the story–occurred years before Stan Kesler became an “in-law in-law.” But the fact Sharon had babysat one of my wife’s sisters-in-law made Elvis seem even more down-to-earth than I’d thought previously.

We just got back from vacationing in Memphis, and I bit the bullet–I HAD to see Graceland while we were there and possibly get a fresh understanding of why people are still so crazy about Elvis.

Walking through that mansion and learning about the various things about it that make it so special made me realize that perhaps Elvis hadn’t simply been trying to spend as much money as he could. He put himself into every aspect of his home.

No wonder I couldn’t help feeling a sense of Elvis-ness in every room.

I know Elvis isn’t really still alive, but since he appeared to have been a sincere Christian in spite of the fact that his life didn’t always show it (he’s probably entertaining folks in Heaven right now), I’ve come to appreciate how much more he was and continues to be, even in death, than I’d ever realized.

I have to concede that maybe he is still alive…kind of.

Your comments are welcome.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Today’s Political Dirty Trick

I’m writing this post on September 26, the day before Judge Kavanaugh’s accuser is set to make her accusations in person. So I don’t know what the outcome will be. But I’m firmly convinced that the Democrats are making the most of this to throw substantial kinks in the midterm elections, especially if the Republicans do as I think they should and stand up for Judge Kavanaugh because the evidence is so weak and the timing of her coming forward and her accusation being made public was so intentionally last-minute.

Chances are you either strongly agree with me or are ready to lynch me for having an attitude you perceive as being unsupportive of women. That couldn’t be further from the truth, and here’s one reason I have the opinions I have.

A few months ago, I read a novel by Jim Callan called Political Dirty Trick, and I thought it rather strange until I realized how realistic it was.

The book is about what was supposed to be a minor crime, one that would keep the opposition candidate from winning when he was accused of committing it. From the beginning, it was to be a crime he would ultimately be found innocent of. But the exoneration wasn’t to happen until after the election, when the proof of his innocence would be too late to help him win the election.

 I’m not going to share any spoilers about Jim Callan’s book, but I would strongly urge you to get a copy on Amazon–look at it on Amazon here–and see if Jim didn’t accurately predict something similar to what’s happening with Judge Kavanaugh.

If Judge Kavanaugh is actually guilty, of course I wouldn’t want him to be appointed to the Supreme Court.

But he deserves due process as much as anyone else, especially since the Far Left is so determined to prevent his appointment. They know he stands for the Constitution, but they want to finish turning America upside down and he’ll stand directly in their way.

If you choose to comment on this post–and I hope you will–be thoughtful and polite. I can eliminate any comment I feel to be inappropriate, but I don’t want to have to. Even it says something I strongly disagree with.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Thank You, Lord, for Making Me Who I Am

Dearest Heavenly Father, You know how much pleasure I get from thanking You for the many ways You’ve blessed me. The old hymn “Count Your Many Blessings” comes to mind, but so does the fact I couldn’t possibly name all of my blessings. In fact, some of them are things I don’t even know about.

But one thing I often thank you for–and now seems like a good time to do it–is for making me who I am.

You could’ve made me a girl. Thank You SO much for not doing that!

You could’ve had me born at any time in human history to any set of parents in any part of the world under any set of circumstances. But You allowed me to be born to a couple whose identity I will likely never know and adopted by Ben and Virginia Bruner. And You’ve kept me from having any great desire to waste time and money searching for my birth parents.

You placed me in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. While America was still great and in the process of becoming great again.

You didn’t make me handsome; You knew that would make me vain. But neither did You make me ugly or repulsive to look at. In spite of my physical weakness, I’m in no way disabled. And despite the number of conditions I take medicine for, I consider myself to be in reasonably good health. I don’t expect that to change today as I celebrate my seventy-second birthday.

You gave me intelligence. Not so much that I would abuse it, but enough to do the things You’ve wanted me to do. And You’ve given me creativity and writing skills. Not enough to be sidetracked by success, but enough to touch the people You’ve wanted my writings to touch.

That’s true of my music as well. You didn’t make me a good enough singer, guitarist, or song writer to succeed in ways You never intended, but You’ve allowed me to share my songs in churches, nursing homes, prisons, migrant camps and to sing on mission trips to Australia, England, Wales, Nicaragua, and Romania, where the blessings I received were undoubtedly far greater than the blessings I bestowed.

Even at seventy-two, I’m thankful that You are still helping me to grow in ways that please You. Jesus set a tough example to follow, but how blessed I am to be a member of Your Family and dedicated to trying to live the way You want me to live. And, no matter how much I enjoy life on earth, I’m even more thankful that I have eternity with You to look forward to. So, although I might be apprehensive of what the death process will be like, I’m blessed not to actually fear death itself.

Lord, I could just keep going. I could thank You that I’m not too tall or too short, that developing diabetes type 2 has motivated me to lose seventy pounds and to keep them off, and that remarriage has proven so much more wonderful than I could possibly have expected or asked for.

But let me conclude this prayer of thanks for making me who I am by thanking You for giving me the idea of sharing these thoughts with the people who read my blog posts.

What about you? Are you thankful for who God has made you to be? How about sharing a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Publishing Stress?

As far back as I can remember, I’ve been possessive of my time. I felt like my time actually belonged to me and I had the freedom to avoid anything that interfered with my concept of how my time should be used.

Unrealistic, huh? Undoubtedly.

One reason I quit teaching school was the impossibility of avoiding taking work home and having to use my personal time. Then there was the time I convinced myself I was doing the right thing leaving work at quitting time while everyone else was still working hard at what I apparently considered less important; I got in big trouble over that.

Retirement promised to give me plenty of free time to do only the things I consider important. Like writing full-time. However, I soon discovered that “writing full-time” and “spending all of my time writing” were not the same, and I couldn’t spend every hour of every day writing. I had to be open to other uses of some of my time.

I’ve continued to carefully evaluate any request for the use of my time, however, and I’ve had to convince myself that relaxing and doing nothing is justifiable–even necessary–some of the time. But I feel guilty if I spend too much time being non-productive.

My life seems pretty well balanced now–especially regarding time-related projects; if I don’t think I can finish something well before time, I’ll probably avoid doing it at all.

Last week, however, I started to wonder. I received email from the publisher of seven of my twelve novels: “Hey, I’ve noticed you’ve ventured into self-publishing. Do you want the rights back to the books I have or shall I keep them?”

At that stage, I’d independently published (used to be called “self-published”) ROSA NO-NAME and my three most recent teen novels. I’d thoroughly enjoyed doing the teen book cover designs, hopefully getting better with each one but definitely learning as I went. I even enjoyed working out the formatting of the content files.

Because marketing falls largely on the author’s shoulders and I haven’t been very good at it–yes, I think my time issue is part of the problem–I’ve felt guilty about not helping my two publishers see more of a profit from having me in their folds.

So taking on the re-publishing of seven novels would free me from that guilt and give me a chance to do something I really enjoyed by doing what was necessary to release those seven books myself. In such a timely way they wouldn’t temporarily be out of print.

My wife and I prayed and talked and we talked and we prayed. Sometimes God doesn’t seem to say yes or no, and this was one of those times. So, for the reasons given in the previous paragraph, we decided to proceed.

My publisher and I agreed she wouldn’t unpublish those books until the end of September. That meant I had a little over three weeks to do everything.

One little problem, though. We have an eight-day vacation between now and the end of the month. Yes, I’ll be taking my laptop, but the idea of having to work on this project then was not very appealing.

So I got right to work, spending a number of hours daily on this project.

The book cover designs were a challenge, but they ultimately didn’t take as much time as I’d feared, and I’m pleased with the results.

My publisher gave me her copy of the formatted content files, which was really great. I thought finishing up would be a breeze. Ha!

I soon realized I wanted certain things changed, and doing that in such a way KDP (Kindle Direct Processing) would accept and make look the way I expected turned out to be really tricky.  Not to mention more time consuming–I spent numerous hours getting rid of blank pages–than expected.

Because of vacation, I’ve really pushed to get everything done. I’ve just ordered proof copies of all seven books.  Unless they arrive before vacation, we’ll only have a couple of days to look over them before the end of the month.

I’ve barely started work on the Kindle versions, but that’s far less of a concern.

Was I wrong to be concerned about the possibility of those seven books being unavailable on Amazon at the very beginning of October? Especially considering how few people know about them or would be apt to buy any during a short blackout period.

Maybe I didn’t need to push so hard, but doing everything I could this far ahead of time is a real relief. And now I can focus on something else without stressing about whether I could get those books ready in time. Not to mention a publishing-free vacation.

(If you’re interested, compare the covers on the two graphics below.)

What about you? Are you sometimes involved in projects that you tend to stress about because of the time factor? How about sharing in a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

     

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A Closeness I Can’t Relate To

Our pastor and his two adult children have built houses almost within spitting distance of one another, and that seems to work well for them. My daughter’s in-laws are living with them, and I assume that’s working out okay. I can think of several couples who’ve moved to be closer to their grown children, and they’re undoubtedly thrilled at being that close.

I definitely don’t mean to sound critical of any of those situations. I’m simply admitting that I don’t understand that kind of family closeness because I can’t relate to it.

I grew up an only child, and my parents reared me to be fiercely independent. They soon realized they’d exceeded their expectations. After college, I lived about two hundred miles from my parents for sixteen years, and I didn’t move to Richmond to be near them, but because that’s where I’d finally found the kind of job I wanted at the place where I’d long wanted to work–the International Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention.

I didn’t normally see them more than once every couple of weeks and rarely talked to them on the phone. We loved one another, of course, but they had their lives and my wife and I had ours.

I suppose my lack of understanding of the situations I described above is based in part on thoughts about the summer when my first wife and I realized the sales job I’d just gotten wasn’t going to work out. We ended up driving nine hundred miles to spend the rest of the summer with her family.

I’m not sure that feeling the need to do that bothered me consciously at the time, but I realize now how I sacrificed my independence for the sake of expediency. At least it was only temporary.

Don’t get me wrong. As the grandfather of two little boys and the step-grandfather of another, all of whom live quite some distance away, I regret not being able to see them more frequently. But those two sets of parents have their own lives, and we’re careful not to interfere.

That would be more difficult if we lived extremely close to one another.

I’m always tickled at the thought of couples moving to be closer to family only to have their family move elsewhere shortly after that. I can’t say I’ve known of that actually happening, but it could–and it probably has.

When God said a man should leave his mother and father and cling to his wife–I’ve always believed that to be equally true of wives–I think He really hit the God-sized nail on the head. Husband and wife must come first. That seems to be true in the cases I mentioned earlier.

What about you? What are your thoughts on this? How about leaving a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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What If…

Do you know anyone who seems to be living a “what if” life? What if this horrible thing happens–or something even worse? How can he or she ever deal with it?

That doesn’t sound like a desirable way to live, does it?

A certain amount of “what if-ing” is probably normal, however. Maybe even desirable.

If we don’t say, “What if I come down with a serious illness?” we might not make sure we have medical insurance, get regular checkups, eat healthy foods, and get the right amount of sleep and exercise.

If we don’t say, “What if I lose my job–or some major expense comes up?” we might fail to set aside money to build an adequate emergency fund.

If we don’t say, “What if the cat knocks the lighted candle over while I’m out and burns the house down,” we might not bother to blow out the flame before we leave.

“What if-ing” that leads us to do smart things makes sense. The same goes for avoiding things that might be dangerous or harmful.

But what about folks who’re burdened by phobias of different kinds? Aren’t they victims of a different kind of “what if”?

If fear of flying makes a person travel an unnecessarily long distance by car or train when a fairly short flight would be more practical, isn’t he a “what if” victim?

And what about victims of agoraphobia–a fear of being in a public place? Their “what ifs” keep them from going out and enjoying much of life.

During early childhood, I apparently had a frightening experience while taking swimming lessons. I’ve suppressed that memory for more than sixty years–so deeply I have no idea what happened. My “what if” about being in the water made me put off being baptized for a number of years because I was so terrified of “what if.”

Those “what ifs”–and dozens of similar ones–seem pretty irrational, don’t they? But they’re real to the sufferer. And, ironically, living in fear of the “what if” may actually make someone more miserable than anything that might happen as the result of doing what the sufferer is so frightened of.

Too often, people don’t take the important “what ifs” of life seriously enough. If they did, no one would drink and drive. No one would die of a tobacco-related disease. No one would commit crime to support a drug habit–or die of an overdose. Accidents that aren’t really accidental would decrease.

No one would ever “need” to have an abortion.

And people who reject Christianity would give it a serious second thought.

Your comments are welcome.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Is There Anything God Can’t Do?

Although most people have some concept of God–or at least one of a god, even if they don’t believe in him–nobody knows everything about Him. The Bible leaves many questions unanswered. I’m still just as confused about the Trinity–God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Holy Spirit all being part of one entity–as if I’d never heard dozens of explanations that made sense until I tried to explain them to someone else.

I have so many questions that will never be answered this side of Heaven. And probably not there, either. I’ll be too overwhelmed at being in God’s presence to feel the need to ask.

No need to ask God why He doesn’t prevent bad things from happening to good people. We live in a fallen world, one that was perfect until our first ancestors, Adam and Eve, messed it up. If they hadn’t, someone else would have.

Neither do I bother to question how a loving God can send people to Hell. God is the epitome of love and goodness. None of us is as good as He is. Hell is something all of us deserve. But Jesus’s death and resurrection make us–those of us who believe in Jesus and accept His gift of eternal life–acceptable to God.

I don’t have any questions about creation, either. I believe God created the world. Whether He did it in six twenty-four-hour days or six periods of time is irrelevant. And I cannot believe the world as we know it originated from nothing–on its own. How can nothing explode and turn into something?

Nor do I question God’s creation of life in its various forms–plant, animal, and human. Adapting to environmental conditions is much different from, and tremendously more logical, than evolution.

God has done so many amazing things I can’t even wrap my head around the possibilities.

If I don’t understand everything the Bible says about God, I doubt that I’m the only one. I would definitely steer clear of anyone who claims to have all the answers.

But some people want to confuse the issue and cause doubt by asking other kinds of questions. Specifically, whether there is anything God can’t do. Surely (from their point of view) even He has limitations.

I laugh at the question “Can God make a rock (or a mountain) that’s too big for Him to lift?” (I can’t imagine why He would want to.) Giving into the temptation to prove He could create such a rock would be sinful; it would be contrary to His loving and perfect nature. To me, that settles the rock question.

What about “If God is love, isn’t He big enough to love everyone enough to save us all from Hell, regardless of how we feel about Him?”

According to the Bible, God wants to save all of us. But He wants each of us to love him, and that brings up an important point. Adam and Eve were born sinless and placed in the most perfect dwelling place on earth. They had everything good. And they enjoyed daily fellowship with God Himself. What more could they have asked for?

But God gave them something else–free will. If He hadn’t given them the freedom to hate or disobey Him, their affection for Him wouldn’t have been real love. It would’ve been like the affection we share with our pets–and our pets with us. So God could not create people who would automatically love Him and never deviate from that love. It had to be voluntary to be love.

You know what? My puny thoughts about what God might not be able to do aren’t going to accomplish anything useful. Better to think about what He has done and continues to do in the lives of His children–His highly imperfect children. That’s so mind-blowing it puts me in the mood for worship.

If you have any thoughts on this subject, please leave a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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