Seniors on the Move: Why Your Loved One Should Join Adult Swimming Lessons

I recently received an offer of some guest blog articles from Chris H at backyardpoolsuperstore.com; they were all relevant to senior adults, but I told Chris I wanted to use this one first. Next Sunday I’ll post the other half of this article.

 

Everyone needs to stay active regardless of their age. And that goes for your elderly loved ones as well. If you’re looking to keep your senior active and in control of their own body, you might want to enroll them in adult swimming lessons. Building above ground pools and dealing with pool chemicals can be expensive and tiresome for some older individuals, so taking them to a community pool might make the most sense. With dozens of different classes to choose from, everyone can find a class that suits their needs and experience level. It’s never too late to learn how to be more comfortable in the water. Learn about the many benefits of having your loved one sign up for adult swimming lessons.

Joint-Friendly Fitness

Swimming and other water-based exercises are known for being easier on the joints. This makes this form of exercise all the more appealing to older individuals who might be dealing with joint pain and arthritis. Seniors can work every muscle in the body when they get in the pool, from strength training to endurance and cardio, without damaging their joints or seeing their arthritis flare up.

It’s important for seniors to stay active if they want to stay mobile and independent. But instead of jogging laps around the neighborhood, they can get their heart pumping by doing those same exercises in the pool. If swimming seems like a tall order, other activities such as aerobics, yoga, crunches, weight training and more can be done in the pool. Regardless of how your loved one likes to exercise, you can find the right class for them.

Joining adult classes also helps them stay on top of fitness goals instead of just wandering around the gym or lounging in the backyard pool. The water adds resistance that helps build muscle and burn calories without the discomfort that comes from bouncing up and down on the treadmill. Joining a class will also help older adults maintain good posture during their routine, so they don’t accidentally hurt themselves.

Improved Mental Health

Studies have shown that water-based exercises can improve mental health in a variety of ways. This can be a major benefit if a person is having trouble remembering information or struggling with dementia. Swimming and other water-based exercises help improve memory, reduce depression and improve the person’s mood. This can be a great way to boost your loved one’s spirits if they are dealing with grief or a loss in the family. Joining a class also provides a group environment where the senior can focus on learning a new exercise or skill, instead of getting lost in their thoughts as they try to work out in isolation.

Spending time at the local community pool can also bring family members closer together. Studies show that engaging in water-based activities can strengthen relationships, helping you reconnect with your loved one.

I’ll be back next Sunday with the rest of this great article. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Elvis Is Still Alive…Kind of


When the church my father was pastoring gave us our first stereo, I was thrilled! Excited!

Sometime previously, I’d started listening to a radio station that played pop music–something I wouldn’t have heard at home otherwise because my parents were big on classical music (on public radio, probably)–and never missed listening to the top thirty countdown on Sunday afternoons.

So, with the gift of the stereo, I was all set to buy some of my favorite 45s. Thanks to a timely birthday party, I had five dollars to spend at an actual record shop. Yes, I bought Sheb Wooley’s “Purple People Eater” and the Everly Brothers’ “Bird Dog,” but I HAD to have Elvis’s “Hard-Headed Woman,” which I still remember so fondly I refer to it on the first page of Do I Ever, one of my quirky romantic novels.

That wasn’t the last of Elvis’s records I bought over the years.

I was no longer much of a fan at the time of his death forty-one years ago however; I preferred his older songs. Honestly, I was probably badly disillusioned at the condition he’d ended up in and at the circumstances of his death.

But several things started working on my mind–and on my point of view. I had a couple of Elvis’s greatest hits albums, and I enjoyed listening to them occasionally.

But I also had at least an in-law relationship with Stan Kesler, who wrote Elvis’s first nationally popular song, “I Forgot to Remember to Forget.” He’s the father of one of my wife’s sisters-in-law, and he’s just the nicest ninety-year-old you could ever hope to meet in spite of bad health, poor vision, and equally poor hearing. And he’d worked at Sun Studio, where Elvis got his start.

How could I possibly not at least have some interest in Elvis because of Stan?

I’d heard the tale years earlier from a co-worker, Sharon, who used to live in Memphis and babysit for a local songwriter. She sent me this reminder of the circumstances a few years ago:

” I met Elvis when I was babysitting for one of his song writers, Stan Kesler (I Forgot to Remember to Forget), in the late 1950’s. He came to the door dressed in all black with the collar of his shirt flipped up and hair in his eyes. He wanted to pick up some music Stan had for him. I made him stand on the front porch while I called Stan to verify, also to get my ‘senses’ back. Elvis was so impressed that I made him stay on the porch that he invited me to dinner at Graceland. I was picked up in a pink Cadillac. After dinner, we looked at photo albums in the music room.”

Sharon’s encounter with Elvis–even her original telling of the story–occurred years before Stan Kesler became an “in-law in-law.” But the fact Sharon had babysat one of my wife’s sisters-in-law made Elvis seem even more down-to-earth than I’d thought previously.

We just got back from vacationing in Memphis, and I bit the bullet–I HAD to see Graceland while we were there and possibly get a fresh understanding of why people are still so crazy about Elvis.

Walking through that mansion and learning about the various things about it that make it so special made me realize that perhaps Elvis hadn’t simply been trying to spend as much money as he could. He put himself into every aspect of his home.

No wonder I couldn’t help feeling a sense of Elvis-ness in every room.

I know Elvis isn’t really still alive, but since he appeared to have been a sincere Christian in spite of the fact that his life didn’t always show it (he’s probably entertaining folks in Heaven right now), I’ve come to appreciate how much more he was and continues to be, even in death, than I’d ever realized.

I have to concede that maybe he is still alive…kind of.

Your comments are welcome.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Today’s Political Dirty Trick

I’m writing this post on September 26, the day before Judge Kavanaugh’s accuser is set to make her accusations in person. So I don’t know what the outcome will be. But I’m firmly convinced that the Democrats are making the most of this to throw substantial kinks in the midterm elections, especially if the Republicans do as I think they should and stand up for Judge Kavanaugh because the evidence is so weak and the timing of her coming forward and her accusation being made public was so intentionally last-minute.

Chances are you either strongly agree with me or are ready to lynch me for having an attitude you perceive as being unsupportive of women. That couldn’t be further from the truth, and here’s one reason I have the opinions I have.

A few months ago, I read a novel by Jim Callan called Political Dirty Trick, and I thought it rather strange until I realized how realistic it was.

The book is about what was supposed to be a minor crime, one that would keep the opposition candidate from winning when he was accused of committing it. From the beginning, it was to be a crime he would ultimately be found innocent of. But the exoneration wasn’t to happen until after the election, when the proof of his innocence would be too late to help him win the election.

 I’m not going to share any spoilers about Jim Callan’s book, but I would strongly urge you to get a copy on Amazon–look at it on Amazon here–and see if Jim didn’t accurately predict something similar to what’s happening with Judge Kavanaugh.

If Judge Kavanaugh is actually guilty, of course I wouldn’t want him to be appointed to the Supreme Court.

But he deserves due process as much as anyone else, especially since the Far Left is so determined to prevent his appointment. They know he stands for the Constitution, but they want to finish turning America upside down and he’ll stand directly in their way.

If you choose to comment on this post–and I hope you will–be thoughtful and polite. I can eliminate any comment I feel to be inappropriate, but I don’t want to have to. Even it says something I strongly disagree with.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Publishing Stress?

As far back as I can remember, I’ve been possessive of my time. I felt like my time actually belonged to me and I had the freedom to avoid anything that interfered with my concept of how my time should be used.

Unrealistic, huh? Undoubtedly.

One reason I quit teaching school was the impossibility of avoiding taking work home and having to use my personal time. Then there was the time I convinced myself I was doing the right thing leaving work at quitting time while everyone else was still working hard at what I apparently considered less important; I got in big trouble over that.

Retirement promised to give me plenty of free time to do only the things I consider important. Like writing full-time. However, I soon discovered that “writing full-time” and “spending all of my time writing” were not the same, and I couldn’t spend every hour of every day writing. I had to be open to other uses of some of my time.

I’ve continued to carefully evaluate any request for the use of my time, however, and I’ve had to convince myself that relaxing and doing nothing is justifiable–even necessary–some of the time. But I feel guilty if I spend too much time being non-productive.

My life seems pretty well balanced now–especially regarding time-related projects; if I don’t think I can finish something well before time, I’ll probably avoid doing it at all.

Last week, however, I started to wonder. I received email from the publisher of seven of my twelve novels: “Hey, I’ve noticed you’ve ventured into self-publishing. Do you want the rights back to the books I have or shall I keep them?”

At that stage, I’d independently published (used to be called “self-published”) ROSA NO-NAME and my three most recent teen novels. I’d thoroughly enjoyed doing the teen book cover designs, hopefully getting better with each one but definitely learning as I went. I even enjoyed working out the formatting of the content files.

Because marketing falls largely on the author’s shoulders and I haven’t been very good at it–yes, I think my time issue is part of the problem–I’ve felt guilty about not helping my two publishers see more of a profit from having me in their folds.

So taking on the re-publishing of seven novels would free me from that guilt and give me a chance to do something I really enjoyed by doing what was necessary to release those seven books myself. In such a timely way they wouldn’t temporarily be out of print.

My wife and I prayed and talked and we talked and we prayed. Sometimes God doesn’t seem to say yes or no, and this was one of those times. So, for the reasons given in the previous paragraph, we decided to proceed.

My publisher and I agreed she wouldn’t unpublish those books until the end of September. That meant I had a little over three weeks to do everything.

One little problem, though. We have an eight-day vacation between now and the end of the month. Yes, I’ll be taking my laptop, but the idea of having to work on this project then was not very appealing.

So I got right to work, spending a number of hours daily on this project.

The book cover designs were a challenge, but they ultimately didn’t take as much time as I’d feared, and I’m pleased with the results.

My publisher gave me her copy of the formatted content files, which was really great. I thought finishing up would be a breeze. Ha!

I soon realized I wanted certain things changed, and doing that in such a way KDP (Kindle Direct Processing) would accept and make look the way I expected turned out to be really tricky.  Not to mention more time consuming–I spent numerous hours getting rid of blank pages–than expected.

Because of vacation, I’ve really pushed to get everything done. I’ve just ordered proof copies of all seven books.  Unless they arrive before vacation, we’ll only have a couple of days to look over them before the end of the month.

I’ve barely started work on the Kindle versions, but that’s far less of a concern.

Was I wrong to be concerned about the possibility of those seven books being unavailable on Amazon at the very beginning of October? Especially considering how few people know about them or would be apt to buy any during a short blackout period.

Maybe I didn’t need to push so hard, but doing everything I could this far ahead of time is a real relief. And now I can focus on something else without stressing about whether I could get those books ready in time. Not to mention a publishing-free vacation.

(If you’re interested, compare the covers on the two graphics below.)

What about you? Are you sometimes involved in projects that you tend to stress about because of the time factor? How about sharing in a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

     

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A Closeness I Can’t Relate To

Our pastor and his two adult children have built houses almost within spitting distance of one another, and that seems to work well for them. My daughter’s in-laws are living with them, and I assume that’s working out okay. I can think of several couples who’ve moved to be closer to their grown children, and they’re undoubtedly thrilled at being that close.

I definitely don’t mean to sound critical of any of those situations. I’m simply admitting that I don’t understand that kind of family closeness because I can’t relate to it.

I grew up an only child, and my parents reared me to be fiercely independent. They soon realized they’d exceeded their expectations. After college, I lived about two hundred miles from my parents for sixteen years, and I didn’t move to Richmond to be near them, but because that’s where I’d finally found the kind of job I wanted at the place where I’d long wanted to work–the International Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention.

I didn’t normally see them more than once every couple of weeks and rarely talked to them on the phone. We loved one another, of course, but they had their lives and my wife and I had ours.

I suppose my lack of understanding of the situations I described above is based in part on thoughts about the summer when my first wife and I realized the sales job I’d just gotten wasn’t going to work out. We ended up driving nine hundred miles to spend the rest of the summer with her family.

I’m not sure that feeling the need to do that bothered me consciously at the time, but I realize now how I sacrificed my independence for the sake of expediency. At least it was only temporary.

Don’t get me wrong. As the grandfather of two little boys and the step-grandfather of another, all of whom live quite some distance away, I regret not being able to see them more frequently. But those two sets of parents have their own lives, and we’re careful not to interfere.

That would be more difficult if we lived extremely close to one another.

I’m always tickled at the thought of couples moving to be closer to family only to have their family move elsewhere shortly after that. I can’t say I’ve known of that actually happening, but it could–and it probably has.

When God said a man should leave his mother and father and cling to his wife–I’ve always believed that to be equally true of wives–I think He really hit the God-sized nail on the head. Husband and wife must come first. That seems to be true in the cases I mentioned earlier.

What about you? What are your thoughts on this? How about leaving a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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What If…

Do you know anyone who seems to be living a “what if” life? What if this horrible thing happens–or something even worse? How can he or she ever deal with it?

That doesn’t sound like a desirable way to live, does it?

A certain amount of “what if-ing” is probably normal, however. Maybe even desirable.

If we don’t say, “What if I come down with a serious illness?” we might not make sure we have medical insurance, get regular checkups, eat healthy foods, and get the right amount of sleep and exercise.

If we don’t say, “What if I lose my job–or some major expense comes up?” we might fail to set aside money to build an adequate emergency fund.

If we don’t say, “What if the cat knocks the lighted candle over while I’m out and burns the house down,” we might not bother to blow out the flame before we leave.

“What if-ing” that leads us to do smart things makes sense. The same goes for avoiding things that might be dangerous or harmful.

But what about folks who’re burdened by phobias of different kinds? Aren’t they victims of a different kind of “what if”?

If fear of flying makes a person travel an unnecessarily long distance by car or train when a fairly short flight would be more practical, isn’t he a “what if” victim?

And what about victims of agoraphobia–a fear of being in a public place? Their “what ifs” keep them from going out and enjoying much of life.

During early childhood, I apparently had a frightening experience while taking swimming lessons. I’ve suppressed that memory for more than sixty years–so deeply I have no idea what happened. My “what if” about being in the water made me put off being baptized for a number of years because I was so terrified of “what if.”

Those “what ifs”–and dozens of similar ones–seem pretty irrational, don’t they? But they’re real to the sufferer. And, ironically, living in fear of the “what if” may actually make someone more miserable than anything that might happen as the result of doing what the sufferer is so frightened of.

Too often, people don’t take the important “what ifs” of life seriously enough. If they did, no one would drink and drive. No one would die of a tobacco-related disease. No one would commit crime to support a drug habit–or die of an overdose. Accidents that aren’t really accidental would decrease.

No one would ever “need” to have an abortion.

And people who reject Christianity would give it a serious second thought.

Your comments are welcome.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Is There Anything God Can’t Do?

Although most people have some concept of God–or at least one of a god, even if they don’t believe in him–nobody knows everything about Him. The Bible leaves many questions unanswered. I’m still just as confused about the Trinity–God the Father, Jesus the Son, and the Holy Spirit all being part of one entity–as if I’d never heard dozens of explanations that made sense until I tried to explain them to someone else.

I have so many questions that will never be answered this side of Heaven. And probably not there, either. I’ll be too overwhelmed at being in God’s presence to feel the need to ask.

No need to ask God why He doesn’t prevent bad things from happening to good people. We live in a fallen world, one that was perfect until our first ancestors, Adam and Eve, messed it up. If they hadn’t, someone else would have.

Neither do I bother to question how a loving God can send people to Hell. God is the epitome of love and goodness. None of us is as good as He is. Hell is something all of us deserve. But Jesus’s death and resurrection make us–those of us who believe in Jesus and accept His gift of eternal life–acceptable to God.

I don’t have any questions about creation, either. I believe God created the world. Whether He did it in six twenty-four-hour days or six periods of time is irrelevant. And I cannot believe the world as we know it originated from nothing–on its own. How can nothing explode and turn into something?

Nor do I question God’s creation of life in its various forms–plant, animal, and human. Adapting to environmental conditions is much different from, and tremendously more logical, than evolution.

God has done so many amazing things I can’t even wrap my head around the possibilities.

If I don’t understand everything the Bible says about God, I doubt that I’m the only one. I would definitely steer clear of anyone who claims to have all the answers.

But some people want to confuse the issue and cause doubt by asking other kinds of questions. Specifically, whether there is anything God can’t do. Surely (from their point of view) even He has limitations.

I laugh at the question “Can God make a rock (or a mountain) that’s too big for Him to lift?” (I can’t imagine why He would want to.) Giving into the temptation to prove He could create such a rock would be sinful; it would be contrary to His loving and perfect nature. To me, that settles the rock question.

What about “If God is love, isn’t He big enough to love everyone enough to save us all from Hell, regardless of how we feel about Him?”

According to the Bible, God wants to save all of us. But He wants each of us to love him, and that brings up an important point. Adam and Eve were born sinless and placed in the most perfect dwelling place on earth. They had everything good. And they enjoyed daily fellowship with God Himself. What more could they have asked for?

But God gave them something else–free will. If He hadn’t given them the freedom to hate or disobey Him, their affection for Him wouldn’t have been real love. It would’ve been like the affection we share with our pets–and our pets with us. So God could not create people who would automatically love Him and never deviate from that love. It had to be voluntary to be love.

You know what? My puny thoughts about what God might not be able to do aren’t going to accomplish anything useful. Better to think about what He has done and continues to do in the lives of His children–His highly imperfect children. That’s so mind-blowing it puts me in the mood for worship.

If you have any thoughts on this subject, please leave a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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