Bombarded!

Every few days my wife turns to me and asks if I saw something particular about one of our friends or acquaintances on Facebook. Although it’s usually something I’m interested in and wish I’d seen, I have to admit to her that–as usual–I failed to see it.

Facebook is a wonderful way to keep in touch with friends and family and to make new friends. I can’t deny that. Nor can I express anything but appreciation for the friends from many years past that I’ve caught up with on Facebook–people I wouldn’t have had any chance of locating and catching up with otherwise.

Whether they’re  former students or co-workers, people I used to know from former churches, or even a friend I’d gone on a mission trip to Australia with but had lost total contact with, my life would be vastly less interesting.

Maybe even lonelier.

So why don’t I pay more attention to Facebook?

Before I try to answer that, I need to admit that I’m that way about other electronic media, too. I have a Pinterest account. A LinkedIn account as well. Originally I posted some pictures on Pinterest, but now I totally ignore it. If I get a contact request from LinkedIn, I’m apt to confirm it. After all, my blog posts go there, and those people are potential readers of my books. Otherwise, why am I there?

And Twitter? Oh, wow! I don’t know why many of the people who choose to follow me do so, but I’ve met a few really interesting people that way. Sure is embarrassing, though, to admit to someone who’s apparently well known that I’ve never heard of them before. Only a few of the people I follow back respond, and I can’t think of more than one or two Tweeters whose names I can even remember. Nope, Twitter gets ignored, too.

But email is the biggie. I normally get several hundred messages a day–and that’s not counting the ones that automatically go to the Junk folder. When I check email, I typically “Select All” and then go down the list, unchecking those I’m really going to have to look at. I delete the ones that are still checked–and that’s apt to be 80-90% of them–and THEN read the few that are left.

Please don’t think I hate people, even though I might sound that way. Some of you have read the post I wrote about being an introvert. Not a shy introvert, but one who tires easily from being around more than a handful of people, and those people must be close to me at that. When I’m in a crowd, I can’t wait to escape.

I think that’s why I feel the way I do about electronic media. In my solitary lifestyle–I’m home by myself most of the day–I’m not apt to seek electronic company. Being bombarded with it is just too much. It’s apt to tire me just as much as being among a crowd of “real” people.

But I do enjoy the company of the select few.

I receive Facebook notices in my email, and I don’t mind those, no matter who they’re from. In fact, I’m happy to respond to them. But at least those are things that relate to me personally.

If I weren’t an author who’s always seeking more readers, I wouldn’t feel under such pressure to deal appropriately with the social media. Although we’re advised not to use the e-media just to make sales pitches, publishers expect authors to have a huge number of media followers.

What about you? Is keeping up with email and social media too much, too? Do you feel bombarded? How about leaving a comment?

NOTE: Various people have complained about not being able to find or leave comments. Go all the way to the bottom of this post, beneath my “Best regards, Roger.” On the very bottom line of that last section just above the previous post you’ll see “Leave a Comment” if yours will be the first or “X Comments,” where  X denotes the number of existing comments.

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Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

Am I Really an Introvert?

When I was in my forties, I took the Myers-Briggs Temperament Inventory–the MBTI–for the first time.  I’ve taken it several times since .

If you’re not familiar with the MBTI, the only thing I can attempt to explain in one short blog post is the fact that the test is able to place each test taker in one of sixteen personality groups. Although there are exceptions, people are inclined to look at the test results with amazement–how could someone figure you out so well on the basis of  questions like those?

If you’ve never taken the MBTI, a version of it is available HERE. It’s well worth the few minutes it’ll take.

I’m an INTJ. That means Introverted-Intuitive-Thinking-Judging. The exact opposite of me would be an ESFP–Extrovert, Sensing, Feeling, Perceiving. Those eight letters can be combined into sixteen four-letter variations. You with me so far?

The significant letter for today’s post is the I. Introverted.

That word isn’t used the way most of us use it. Neither is “extroverted.” Those two words refer to whether being around a number of other people energizes or wears a person out. So “introverted” has nothing to do with shyness, but with the fact that an introvert enjoys the company of a small number of close friends, but is totally exhausted by having to spend time in a crowd.

The HR director who interpreted my first MBTI illustrated this way. She’s an I, and when she finishes teaching a class, she’s ready to return to her office and collapse. An extrovert is apt to rub his hands together and say, “That was fun. When’s the next class? Tomorrow? Do I really have to wait till then?”

Sometimes a person falls on the line between two categories, not being strongly an I or an E, an N or an S, A T or an F, or a J or a P.  When it comes to introversion, I am far on the I-side of the scale. So, not surprisingly, I don’t look forward to big parties or any type of large gathering. And when I have to attend such an event, I’m not only anxious for it to end, but totally exhausted long before the end.

Does that mean I don’t like people, though? Very definitely not! I really enjoy people who are close friends or family and in a group of limited size. So, if I don’t already know you, I would really love to meet you. But maybe it would be better if you don’t introduce me to all of your friends, family, and neighbors. Not all at the same time, anyhow.

But it does explain why I web programming, writing, and reading as much as I do.

Incidentally, just for the heck of it, I took the MBTI again a couple of minutes ago. If I recall correctly, I was originally on the line between intuitive and sensing. Now I’ve moved over into sensing.

How about sharing your MBTI type in a comment? If you’ve never taken the test, take a few minutes to do so and then leave a comment.

NOTE: Various people have complained about not being able to find or leave comments. Go all the way to the bottom of this post, beneath my “Best regards, Roger.” On the very bottom line of that last section just above the previous post you’ll see “Leave a Comment” if yours will be the first or “X Comments,” where  X denotes the number of existing comments.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger