How Will You Be Remembered?

What probably sticks out the most in my mind from last Saturday’s luncheon for people who graduated from Frostburg State University fifty years ago wasn’t seeing a few familiar people, but having a time of remembrance for former classmates who’ve passed away.

 

A good-sized list of those stood on a table at one end of the room, and co-master of ceremonies Pat Garrett went through that list name by name as part of the luncheon’s events. He told whatever he knew about each person and asked attendees to share anything they knew or remembered about the deceased.

A number of the deceased were remembered only as having been good people–or nice ones. But those were still positive memories.

Many of the deceased either weren’t commented on at all, however. Whether they had truly been that inconspicuous during their college years or attendees didn’t feel it was right to say bad things about them, I couldn’t say.

I can’t help being curious. Once I’ve passed away, what will people at future reunions remember about me? I wasn’t an athlete. I wasn’t in any activities except the Baptist Student Union. (If any of my friends from the BSU came to the reunion, I didn’t see them.) I did play my guitar and sing at the Leaves of Grass coffee house on Friday nights, but that probably wasn’t overly memorable, either.

Hmm.

Death for a Christian is a good thing, not something to dread or regret. We believe we’ll be in a better place. Such a perfect place it makes the best earth has to offer seem trivial and worthless.

But that doesn’t mean we don’t want to be remembered–and hopefully in a good way. I don’t know about other peoples’ legacies, but I hope and pray that my novels and songs (maybe even some of my blog posts) will prove to be a worthy legacy, even if they’re not overly popular.

Success with the masses now or later isn’t the important thing. Blessing lives–eve a few lives–is, even if people don’t remember my name.

Twenty-five years ago I wrote a song called “What Will You Leave Behind?” Several years ago I did a video selfie of myself playing and singing that song. I keep the DVD in a lock box under the bed…to be played at my funeral, which I hope won’t be anytime soon.

The lyrics go like this:

When you die, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Precious memories for your friends and family
Or relief that you’re no longer there?
Will the faith you’ve shared bring them comfort
Or your hopelessness cause them more grief?
When you die, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

When you pass away, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Will your words continue to encourage
Or the harm they’ve engendered linger on?
Do your teachings tell of God’s Kingdom
While your actions point the other way?
When you pass away, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

When you depart this life, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Will the good you’ve planted bloom like flowers
Or the problems you’ve sown spread like weeds?
Is your life well invested in others
Or will your influence die at your death?
When you depart this life, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

How I hope I will be remembered for the good. What about you? How do you think you’ll be remembered?

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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You Can’t Go Home Again…or Can You?

I’ve never been to a high school reunion, although I’m keeping watch for information about the 55th year reunion next year. But when I received a very nice invitation to a special luncheon for those of us who graduated from Frostburg State College (now University) fifty years ago, I found myself more interested than I would typically be for something like that.

I’d lived in Cumberland, Maryland, the four years I was in college. I attendedĀ  Allegany Community College (now the Allegany College of Maryland) which was just a few blocks from home and then transferred to Frostburg for my last two years. I stayed off-campus at the college during the week.

My memories of college life are pretty spotty, but the older I’ve grown, the greater my desire to see people and places from my past. So my wife, Kathleen, encouraged me to plan on us attending the reunion, which was to be held during Homecoming. I agreed. Gladly.

As time drew closer, however, I wasn’t able to determine that very many of the people I really wanted to see would be attending. And when I saw the names of people who would be attending an informal Friday night restaurant get-together, most of even the familiar names were people I hadn’t really known. Thank goodness one of my old roommates and his wife were going to be there!

So I felt slightly apprehensive about being in even a small gathering of basically strangers. That wouldn’t be “home” the way being with some of the folks I really wanted to see would have been, but I not only felt comfortable in that group, I enjoyed it.

There was only one problem. Everyone looked so old! Or so much older, anyhow. I didn’t even recognize my former roommate at first, although he recognized me.

But if physical changes to my fellow grads were, uh, sometimes more substantial than others, changes to the campus were even more drastic. Kathleen and I drove around the campus for a little while before heading to the restaurant, and I didn’t recognize anything! The number of new buildings was beyond my ability to comprehend. Very attractive, but nonetheless very strange to eyes that had seen things the way they used to look.

I’m writing this half an hour before Kathleen and I drive to the campus again. Thank goodness for the map we were provided for finding where to park and where at the building housing the luncheon!

Today is a dreary, rainy day. I’m afraid we won’t be walking around to view the campus. That’s frustrating,

Kind of. But the people–even just a few–will make Frostburg seem more like home than the university itself.

P.S. We enjoyed the luncheon today, but there were far more people than I’d expected. I couldn’t very well go around inspecting every name tag to see if it belonged to someone I knew. However, I did run into one person I’d known even before attending Frostburg. He’d belonged to the church in Cumberland my father had pastored, and my father had even married him and his wife. That was extra special.

I have to add that the president of the university welcomed the group, and his remarks really helped to put the relative newness of the university into perspective. Nonetheless, we 1968 graduates represented one phase in Frostburg’s development. But the university has moved far past where we were.

So it wasn’t home. Not the “home” we knew back then. But a worthy one for future students.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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