Live a Long Life: Eight of the Best Tips for Healthy Aging

 

Welcome to another great guest post by Kaki Zell. Thanks SO much, Kaki!

 

Whenever a person turns 100 or older, friends, family and even reporters ask them: “What’s your secret?” Centenarians and supercentenarians (those who have lived past their 110th birthday) often have unique takes on why they’ve lived so long — 117-year-old Emma Murano said the secret to longevity is “being single,” while the third-oldest verified person ever, Nabi Tajima, said the key to a long life is “eating delicious things.”

Based on their responses, there is no one secret to aging past 100 — but there are a few ways to encourage healthy aging at any decade that are backed by cold, hard data. Until we discover the Fountain of Youth, here are some of the things you can do to foster healthy aging.

 

 

  1. Eat Well and Exercise — The two fundamentals to a healthy life at any age are diet and exercise. What you eat and how much you move have major effects on how you age. Nutritionists recommend eating a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and healthy fats in order to provide your body with the right amount of nutrients. This healthy diet will also help prevent weight gain, which could lead to heart disease, diabetes and some cancers.
  2. Get the Right Amount of Sleep — Like diet and exercise, sleep is fundamental to good health. The National Sleep Foundation warns that people with sleep problems are at a much higher risk for significantly diminished health. Untreated sleep disorders — including insomnia, excessive sleepiness and sleep apnea — have also been linked to heart disease, stroke, depression, diabetes, hypertension and other chronic or life-threatening diseases. Beyond getting enough sleep at night, studies also show that napping is good for you, so go ahead and relish that afternoon snooze.
  3. Boost Your Circulation — To live a long, healthy life, you need to get your blood moving. Poor circulation can prevent your body from staying healthy, healing well and functioning properly during everyday activities. In other words, it can hold you back from the things you want to do in your twilight years. Wearing compression gear as part of a compression therapy program is an easy way to improve your circulation so that blood can properly transport essential oxygen and nutrients to the rest of the body. Putting on a pair of compression socks each morning can also help reduce foot and leg pain and swelling as an added bonus.
  4. Travel as Much as You Can — Looking for an excuse to finally book that luxury cruise? Here’s one: it can actually help you live longer. Research shows that those who do not vacation annually are at a 30 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. Other studies indicate that there’s a link between happiness and travel, so sunning on the beach or touring a famous landmark might benefit your mental and cognitive health, too. The primary reason taking a trip can support health and well-being is that it’s a surefire way to decrease stress, which is often the silent culprit behind many of our most pressing health issues.

  1. Take Up a New Hobby — There’s a wide variety of hobbies and activities that are linked to better health and happiness, from sports (for the obvious reasons) to writing, which improves cognitive performance and concentration. There are a few other activities you may be surprised to learn can prolong your life, including reading, gardening, playing chess, playing an instrument and cooking. Learning a new skill or taking up a new hobby is an excellent retirement activity and can connect you with likeminded people to foster social connections, so it’s an all-around win.
  2. Take Care of Your Teeth —Many people are surprised to learn that there’s a connection between the health of our teeth and the health of the rest of our body. The American Heart Association says that gum disease — the buildup of plaque that can cause tooth decay — shares risk factors with heart attack and stroke, and doctors often use oral health as an indicator of heart health. Good oral health also helps prevent bad breath, dry mouth, sores and cavities, which can cause stress and low self-esteem. So, the next time your dentist scolds you about not flossing enough, take it seriously!
  3. Stay Social — Study after study confirms the notion that good friendships help you live longer, so making your lunch and dinner dates a priority is certainly a good strategy to vitality. Loneliness is closely linked to lower mortality rates, with some studies suggesting that it could be as dangerous to your health as smoking. Similarly, those with stronger social relationships have a much higher (as much as 50 percent) likelihood of survival. The fact is that social connections are fundamental to a healthy lifestyle right alongside diet, exercise and getting enough sleep, so make sure you’re spending plenty of quality time with friends and family.
  4. It’s All About Prevention — An ounce of prevention is worth… well, you know the saying. One of the best things you can do to ensure that you live a long, healthy life is to practice prevention. With so many new medical advancements and insight, there is simply no excuse not to take the preventative route as often as you can. You can practice effective prevention through diet, exercise, regular health screenings, quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight and limiting your consumption of alcohol and processed foods. Make sure that you monitor your blood pressure and cholesterol regularly as part of your prevention plan.

Thanks again, Kaki!

Comments are always welcome.

I’ll be back again next Sunday–or whenever I next have something to say. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Seniors on the Move: Why Your Loved One Should Join Adult Swimming Lessons

I recently received an offer of some guest blog articles from Chris H at backyardpoolsuperstore.com; they were all relevant to senior adults, but I told Chris I wanted to use this one first. Next Sunday I’ll post the other half of this article.

 

Everyone needs to stay active regardless of their age. And that goes for your elderly loved ones as well. If you’re looking to keep your senior active and in control of their own body, you might want to enroll them in adult swimming lessons. Building above ground pools and dealing with pool chemicals can be expensive and tiresome for some older individuals, so taking them to a community pool might make the most sense. With dozens of different classes to choose from, everyone can find a class that suits their needs and experience level. It’s never too late to learn how to be more comfortable in the water. Learn about the many benefits of having your loved one sign up for adult swimming lessons.

Joint-Friendly Fitness

Swimming and other water-based exercises are known for being easier on the joints. This makes this form of exercise all the more appealing to older individuals who might be dealing with joint pain and arthritis. Seniors can work every muscle in the body when they get in the pool, from strength training to endurance and cardio, without damaging their joints or seeing their arthritis flare up.

It’s important for seniors to stay active if they want to stay mobile and independent. But instead of jogging laps around the neighborhood, they can get their heart pumping by doing those same exercises in the pool. If swimming seems like a tall order, other activities such as aerobics, yoga, crunches, weight training and more can be done in the pool. Regardless of how your loved one likes to exercise, you can find the right class for them.

Joining adult classes also helps them stay on top of fitness goals instead of just wandering around the gym or lounging in the backyard pool. The water adds resistance that helps build muscle and burn calories without the discomfort that comes from bouncing up and down on the treadmill. Joining a class will also help older adults maintain good posture during their routine, so they don’t accidentally hurt themselves.

Improved Mental Health

Studies have shown that water-based exercises can improve mental health in a variety of ways. This can be a major benefit if a person is having trouble remembering information or struggling with dementia. Swimming and other water-based exercises help improve memory, reduce depression and improve the person’s mood. This can be a great way to boost your loved one’s spirits if they are dealing with grief or a loss in the family. Joining a class also provides a group environment where the senior can focus on learning a new exercise or skill, instead of getting lost in their thoughts as they try to work out in isolation.

Spending time at the local community pool can also bring family members closer together. Studies show that engaging in water-based activities can strengthen relationships, helping you reconnect with your loved one.

I’ll be back next Sunday with the rest of this great article. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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