How Will You Be Remembered?

What probably sticks out the most in my mind from last Saturday’s luncheon for people who graduated from Frostburg State University fifty years ago wasn’t seeing a few familiar people, but having a time of remembrance for former classmates who’ve passed away.

 

A good-sized list of those stood on a table at one end of the room, and co-master of ceremonies Pat Garrett went through that list name by name as part of the luncheon’s events. He told whatever he knew about each person and asked attendees to share anything they knew or remembered about the deceased.

A number of the deceased were remembered only as having been good people–or nice ones. But those were still positive memories.

Many of the deceased either weren’t commented on at all, however. Whether they had truly been that inconspicuous during their college years or attendees didn’t feel it was right to say bad things about them, I couldn’t say.

I can’t help being curious. Once I’ve passed away, what will people at future reunions remember about me? I wasn’t an athlete. I wasn’t in any activities except the Baptist Student Union. (If any of my friends from the BSU came to the reunion, I didn’t see them.) I did play my guitar and sing at the Leaves of Grass coffee house on Friday nights, but that probably wasn’t overly memorable, either.

Hmm.

Death for a Christian is a good thing, not something to dread or regret. We believe we’ll be in a better place. Such a perfect place it makes the best earth has to offer seem trivial and worthless.

But that doesn’t mean we don’t want to be remembered–and hopefully in a good way. I don’t know about other peoples’ legacies, but I hope and pray that my novels and songs (maybe even some of my blog posts) will prove to be a worthy legacy, even if they’re not overly popular.

Success with the masses now or later isn’t the important thing. Blessing lives–eve a few lives–is, even if people don’t remember my name.

Twenty-five years ago I wrote a song called “What Will You Leave Behind?” Several years ago I did a video selfie of myself playing and singing that song. I keep the DVD in a lock box under the bed…to be played at my funeral, which I hope won’t be anytime soon.

The lyrics go like this:

When you die, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Precious memories for your friends and family
Or relief that you’re no longer there?
Will the faith you’ve shared bring them comfort
Or your hopelessness cause them more grief?
When you die, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

When you pass away, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Will your words continue to encourage
Or the harm they’ve engendered linger on?
Do your teachings tell of God’s Kingdom
While your actions point the other way?
When you pass away, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

When you depart this life, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?
Will the good you’ve planted bloom like flowers
Or the problems you’ve sown spread like weeds?
Is your life well invested in others
Or will your influence die at your death?
When you depart this life, you can’t take it with you,
But what will you leave behind?

How I hope I will be remembered for the good. What about you? How do you think you’ll be remembered?

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Seniors on the Move: Why Your Loved One Should Join Adult Swimming Lessons (conclusion)

Thanks once more to Chris H of backyardpoolsuperstore.com for this interesting and worthwhile guest post article. If you missed part one, you’ll want to go back and read it to get the complete picture.

 

Increasing Flexibility

Stretching and extending the body can be a challenge as we get older. Joints and limbs don’t seem to stretch as far as they used to after a certain age. But seniors can get in touch with their bodies and increase their flexibility by participating in swimming lessons and classes for other water-based exercises. Swimming forces you to use the body in new ways as you kick and extend your limbs in all different directions. Learning a new stroke or how to hold their bodies in the water can lead to some surprising results as seniors learn how to be more comfortable and confident in the water. With the help and support of a class, elderly people can learn from their mistakes and discover how to use their body in new ways without worrying about injuring themselves.

Improving Balance and Control

As we get older, we tend to struggle with balance issues and tend to be more prone to slips and falls. Just one wrong turn can lead to a lifetime of pain if the person isn’t careful. But instead of watching your loved one’s physical condition worsen over time, you can help them improve their balance and control by enrolling them in adult swimming classes.

Learning a new stroke and helping them perfect their swimming abilities shows them how to steady themselves in the water. They’ll learn to work their core muscles as they move through the water, which they can use to help them stay upright as they climb the stairs, get in and out of the car and other accident-prone situations where older adults might be at risk of suffering a fall. They’ll be more independent, and you won’t have to worry about them injuring themselves when you’re not around to supervise.

Staying Social

Making friends can be difficult as we get older. If your loved one is feeling lonely and isolated from the community, enrolling them in adult swimming classes might be just what they’re looking for. They can meet other members of the community, learn a new skill in a group setting and create shared experiences with people they might not have gotten to know otherwise. Staying social also helps improve the person’s mood, physical health and cognitive abilities, so they can continue developing these relationships after the class ends. Getting old is so much easier when your loved one can depend on the love and support of their community.

Reducing Chronic Illness

Seniors can experience all kinds of chronic illnesses later in life, including arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. That’s why water-based exercises like swimming can be so beneficial. These exercises can reduce their pain and improve their functionality without worsening their symptoms. Overall, this improves your loved one’s overall quality of life, helping them ward off the unpleasant aspects of aging like chronic pain, fatigue and lack of independence.

If you’re looking for a surefire way to boost your loved one’s mood, physical abilities and reduce their chronic pain, look no further than adult swimming classes. Trying something new and learning a new skill can be difficult for some older individuals, but if they stick with it, it’s only a matter of time before they see the benefits.

 ~*~

Thanks again to Chris for this interesting and worthwhile guest post. I hope this won’t be the last of Chris’s articles we can use.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Seniors on the Move: Why Your Loved One Should Join Adult Swimming Lessons

I recently received an offer of some guest blog articles from Chris H at backyardpoolsuperstore.com; they were all relevant to senior adults, but I told Chris I wanted to use this one first. Next Sunday I’ll post the other half of this article.

 

Everyone needs to stay active regardless of their age. And that goes for your elderly loved ones as well. If you’re looking to keep your senior active and in control of their own body, you might want to enroll them in adult swimming lessons. Building above ground pools and dealing with pool chemicals can be expensive and tiresome for some older individuals, so taking them to a community pool might make the most sense. With dozens of different classes to choose from, everyone can find a class that suits their needs and experience level. It’s never too late to learn how to be more comfortable in the water. Learn about the many benefits of having your loved one sign up for adult swimming lessons.

Joint-Friendly Fitness

Swimming and other water-based exercises are known for being easier on the joints. This makes this form of exercise all the more appealing to older individuals who might be dealing with joint pain and arthritis. Seniors can work every muscle in the body when they get in the pool, from strength training to endurance and cardio, without damaging their joints or seeing their arthritis flare up.

It’s important for seniors to stay active if they want to stay mobile and independent. But instead of jogging laps around the neighborhood, they can get their heart pumping by doing those same exercises in the pool. If swimming seems like a tall order, other activities such as aerobics, yoga, crunches, weight training and more can be done in the pool. Regardless of how your loved one likes to exercise, you can find the right class for them.

Joining adult classes also helps them stay on top of fitness goals instead of just wandering around the gym or lounging in the backyard pool. The water adds resistance that helps build muscle and burn calories without the discomfort that comes from bouncing up and down on the treadmill. Joining a class will also help older adults maintain good posture during their routine, so they don’t accidentally hurt themselves.

Improved Mental Health

Studies have shown that water-based exercises can improve mental health in a variety of ways. This can be a major benefit if a person is having trouble remembering information or struggling with dementia. Swimming and other water-based exercises help improve memory, reduce depression and improve the person’s mood. This can be a great way to boost your loved one’s spirits if they are dealing with grief or a loss in the family. Joining a class also provides a group environment where the senior can focus on learning a new exercise or skill, instead of getting lost in their thoughts as they try to work out in isolation.

Spending time at the local community pool can also bring family members closer together. Studies show that engaging in water-based activities can strengthen relationships, helping you reconnect with your loved one.

I’ll be back next Sunday with the rest of this great article. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Today’s Political Dirty Trick

I’m writing this post on September 26, the day before Judge Kavanaugh’s accuser is set to make her accusations in person. So I don’t know what the outcome will be. But I’m firmly convinced that the Democrats are making the most of this to throw substantial kinks in the midterm elections, especially if the Republicans do as I think they should and stand up for Judge Kavanaugh because the evidence is so weak and the timing of her coming forward and her accusation being made public was so intentionally last-minute.

Chances are you either strongly agree with me or are ready to lynch me for having an attitude you perceive as being unsupportive of women. That couldn’t be further from the truth, and here’s one reason I have the opinions I have.

A few months ago, I read a novel by Jim Callan called Political Dirty Trick, and I thought it rather strange until I realized how realistic it was.

The book is about what was supposed to be a minor crime, one that would keep the opposition candidate from winning when he was accused of committing it. From the beginning, it was to be a crime he would ultimately be found innocent of. But the exoneration wasn’t to happen until after the election, when the proof of his innocence would be too late to help him win the election.

 I’m not going to share any spoilers about Jim Callan’s book, but I would strongly urge you to get a copy on Amazon–look at it on Amazon here–and see if Jim didn’t accurately predict something similar to what’s happening with Judge Kavanaugh.

If Judge Kavanaugh is actually guilty, of course I wouldn’t want him to be appointed to the Supreme Court.

But he deserves due process as much as anyone else, especially since the Far Left is so determined to prevent his appointment. They know he stands for the Constitution, but they want to finish turning America upside down and he’ll stand directly in their way.

If you choose to comment on this post–and I hope you will–be thoughtful and polite. I can eliminate any comment I feel to be inappropriate, but I don’t want to have to. Even it says something I strongly disagree with.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Thank You, Lord, for Making Me Who I Am

Dearest Heavenly Father, You know how much pleasure I get from thanking You for the many ways You’ve blessed me. The old hymn “Count Your Many Blessings” comes to mind, but so does the fact I couldn’t possibly name all of my blessings. In fact, some of them are things I don’t even know about.

But one thing I often thank you for–and now seems like a good time to do it–is for making me who I am.

You could’ve made me a girl. Thank You SO much for not doing that!

You could’ve had me born at any time in human history to any set of parents in any part of the world under any set of circumstances. But You allowed me to be born to a couple whose identity I will likely never know and adopted by Ben and Virginia Bruner. And You’ve kept me from having any great desire to waste time and money searching for my birth parents.

You placed me in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. While America was still great and in the process of becoming great again.

You didn’t make me handsome; You knew that would make me vain. But neither did You make me ugly or repulsive to look at. In spite of my physical weakness, I’m in no way disabled. And despite the number of conditions I take medicine for, I consider myself to be in reasonably good health. I don’t expect that to change today as I celebrate my seventy-second birthday.

You gave me intelligence. Not so much that I would abuse it, but enough to do the things You’ve wanted me to do. And You’ve given me creativity and writing skills. Not enough to be sidetracked by success, but enough to touch the people You’ve wanted my writings to touch.

That’s true of my music as well. You didn’t make me a good enough singer, guitarist, or song writer to succeed in ways You never intended, but You’ve allowed me to share my songs in churches, nursing homes, prisons, migrant camps and to sing on mission trips to Australia, England, Wales, Nicaragua, and Romania, where the blessings I received were undoubtedly far greater than the blessings I bestowed.

Even at seventy-two, I’m thankful that You are still helping me to grow in ways that please You. Jesus set a tough example to follow, but how blessed I am to be a member of Your Family and dedicated to trying to live the way You want me to live. And, no matter how much I enjoy life on earth, I’m even more thankful that I have eternity with You to look forward to. So, although I might be apprehensive of what the death process will be like, I’m blessed not to actually fear death itself.

Lord, I could just keep going. I could thank You that I’m not too tall or too short, that developing diabetes type 2 has motivated me to lose seventy pounds and to keep them off, and that remarriage has proven so much more wonderful than I could possibly have expected or asked for.

But let me conclude this prayer of thanks for making me who I am by thanking You for giving me the idea of sharing these thoughts with the people who read my blog posts.

What about you? Are you thankful for who God has made you to be? How about sharing a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Publishing Stress?

As far back as I can remember, I’ve been possessive of my time. I felt like my time actually belonged to me and I had the freedom to avoid anything that interfered with my concept of how my time should be used.

Unrealistic, huh? Undoubtedly.

One reason I quit teaching school was the impossibility of avoiding taking work home and having to use my personal time. Then there was the time I convinced myself I was doing the right thing leaving work at quitting time while everyone else was still working hard at what I apparently considered less important; I got in big trouble over that.

Retirement promised to give me plenty of free time to do only the things I consider important. Like writing full-time. However, I soon discovered that “writing full-time” and “spending all of my time writing” were not the same, and I couldn’t spend every hour of every day writing. I had to be open to other uses of some of my time.

I’ve continued to carefully evaluate any request for the use of my time, however, and I’ve had to convince myself that relaxing and doing nothing is justifiable–even necessary–some of the time. But I feel guilty if I spend too much time being non-productive.

My life seems pretty well balanced now–especially regarding time-related projects; if I don’t think I can finish something well before time, I’ll probably avoid doing it at all.

Last week, however, I started to wonder. I received email from the publisher of seven of my twelve novels: “Hey, I’ve noticed you’ve ventured into self-publishing. Do you want the rights back to the books I have or shall I keep them?”

At that stage, I’d independently published (used to be called “self-published”) ROSA NO-NAME and my three most recent teen novels. I’d thoroughly enjoyed doing the teen book cover designs, hopefully getting better with each one but definitely learning as I went. I even enjoyed working out the formatting of the content files.

Because marketing falls largely on the author’s shoulders and I haven’t been very good at it–yes, I think my time issue is part of the problem–I’ve felt guilty about not helping my two publishers see more of a profit from having me in their folds.

So taking on the re-publishing of seven novels would free me from that guilt and give me a chance to do something I really enjoyed by doing what was necessary to release those seven books myself. In such a timely way they wouldn’t temporarily be out of print.

My wife and I prayed and talked and we talked and we prayed. Sometimes God doesn’t seem to say yes or no, and this was one of those times. So, for the reasons given in the previous paragraph, we decided to proceed.

My publisher and I agreed she wouldn’t unpublish those books until the end of September. That meant I had a little over three weeks to do everything.

One little problem, though. We have an eight-day vacation between now and the end of the month. Yes, I’ll be taking my laptop, but the idea of having to work on this project then was not very appealing.

So I got right to work, spending a number of hours daily on this project.

The book cover designs were a challenge, but they ultimately didn’t take as much time as I’d feared, and I’m pleased with the results.

My publisher gave me her copy of the formatted content files, which was really great. I thought finishing up would be a breeze. Ha!

I soon realized I wanted certain things changed, and doing that in such a way KDP (Kindle Direct Processing) would accept and make look the way I expected turned out to be really tricky.  Not to mention more time consuming–I spent numerous hours getting rid of blank pages–than expected.

Because of vacation, I’ve really pushed to get everything done. I’ve just ordered proof copies of all seven books.  Unless they arrive before vacation, we’ll only have a couple of days to look over them before the end of the month.

I’ve barely started work on the Kindle versions, but that’s far less of a concern.

Was I wrong to be concerned about the possibility of those seven books being unavailable on Amazon at the very beginning of October? Especially considering how few people know about them or would be apt to buy any during a short blackout period.

Maybe I didn’t need to push so hard, but doing everything I could this far ahead of time is a real relief. And now I can focus on something else without stressing about whether I could get those books ready in time. Not to mention a publishing-free vacation.

(If you’re interested, compare the covers on the two graphics below.)

What about you? Are you sometimes involved in projects that you tend to stress about because of the time factor? How about sharing in a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

     

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A New Normal (in One Room, Anyhow)


Last week I talked about waiting, and I mentioned that we were waiting for someone to come give us an estimate on new flooring for the living room, kitchen, and maybe the bedroom.

Our wishes turned out to be a little ambitious.

What we had saved would take care of the living room alone, and–after three or four years (maybe longer) of being totally out of debt–we weren’t about to even do a one-year interest-free arrangement. That would still have meant being obligated to spend money we didn’t have yet.

We also had to compromise on the specific wooden flooring we’d originally wanted. But the laminate we settled on looks great and will serve well. Why spend enough for a floor that would outlive us?

Today’s (this past Tuesday) the big day–a lot sooner than we’d expected–and two quiet Latino men are in the midst of the installation. Fortunately, THEY do the furniture moving. But we still had to move breakables, spillables, and other miscellaneous small stuff. I dread having to put everything back in place later.

        

I must admit I’ve been fascinated watching the men as they work. And just as fascinated at how much Spanish I’ve forgotten since high school and college. But one thing hasn’t changed. I still can’t listen fast enough to comprehend even the Spanish I would recognize if I saw it in writing. Spanish is indeed a beautiful language, but those words seem to connect in what for me are incomprehensible ways.

I envy Kathleen. She got to go to work today while I sit here with my laptop at the end of the counter where I normally sit to eat breakfast. Right now I have one foot draped over the pen we were smart enough to keep when our miniature dachshund, Happy, no longer needed it otherwise. She keeps jumping up and barking (not necessarily in that order), but I think my foot gives her some assurance.

As of this moment, I’d say the guys are more than half done. If it weren’t for corners, heating vents, and a place where the cable comes through the floor, it would undoubtedly be a straight shot.

Nonetheless, the new normal is coming. The six-by-six rug we ordered last weekend–we wanted a splash of color–is due today, and it can’t take but so long to put everything back in place.

I hope.

Here’s the finished job. We’re thrilled!

Do you have a tale of some home improvement you’ve done and had done? Please leave a comment.

~*~

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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