Aging: Plus or Minus?

I just spent an hour or so trying to write a decent post on a serious subject, and I ended up too depressed to finish it. Not good. So I decided to try something different.

As many of you know, I’m just a few months away from turning seventy. What you may not know is I have mixed feelings about it. So if you’ll permit me to look at the pluses and minuses of aging, I’ll be grateful.

Plus: I’m retired, and I have very few required activities. Most of those can be done at my leisure. I’m free to pursue my writing and play my guitar whenever I like and continue recording my compositions at home.
Minus: Despite the variety of activities I enjoy doing, if I’m not careful, even the best of those activities can become routine.

Minus: I take a variety of kinds of medicines and still have aches and pains that seemingly have no cause.
Plus: Those medicines help to keep me in what I would basically consider good health.  Why should I be upset? I don’t gripe about having to wear glasses, do I? And the undiagnosable aches and pains aren’t that horrible. Yet.

Minus: Each week at my church’s nursing home ministry, I can’t keep from wondering whether I’ll someday need to use the LTC (Long term care) insurance we finally decided we’d be foolish not to have.
Plus: I’m not in a nursing home yet, and I don’t have any conditions that make LTC living seem likely in the foreseeable future. And if I do end up in a nursing home, maybe by then I’ll be sufficiently, uh, not-myself to care.

Minus: I can’t do everything I used to be able to do.
Plus: I should be thankful for how many of them I can still do. Sure, my agility makes my guitar playing harder at times, but at least I can still play. In fact, I can’t think of anything I can’t still do at all. Maybe just not as well or as quickly.

Minus: I’m becoming more forgetful.
Plus: At least I haven’t forgotten anything important. And I’ve always had trouble remembering people’s names and faces. Did I honestly expect that to improve with age?

Minus: With the extra time I have now, I’ve become more interested in politics. And I’ve become more concerned about the decline in American values, especially during the last eight years. It’s depressing. Especially considering our choices in the upcoming election.
Plus: I can still vote and I can still pray. It may not be in God’s will to restore America’s greatness, but I have every confidence that He can.  I believe in the power of prayer, and that makes me feel so much better.

Minus: In spite of everything, I know I’ll continue to age and deteriorate until the end comes.
Plus: Hmm. That’s true for all of us, isn’t it? But as a Christian, I have the promise of Heaven to look forward to. That should relieve me of my complaints about any aspect of aging.

Do you have any particular pluses and minuses about the idea of aging? How about leaving a comment?

NOTE: Various people have complained about not being able to find or leave comments. Go all the way to the bottom of this post, beneath my “Best regards, Roger.” On the very bottom line of that last section just above the previous post you’ll see “Leave a Comment” if yours will be the first or “X Comments,” where  X denotes the number of existing comments.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Wednesday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

Advertisements

Why Vote?

I’ve visited Australia five or six times over the last twenty-some years. Wonderful country,  even if it’s become too Americanized in some ways. If you question that, you should turn on a TV set in Oz and see how many American shows are popular there.

But one thing comes to mind as different. Quite different. Radically different.

Unless I was misinformed or things have changed over the last few years, Australians are legally required to vote. Can you believe that? As much freedom as Aussies enjoy otherwise, they don’t have the freedom to refrain from voting.

Hmm. How would that go over in the United States? I can’t begin to imagine the specifics, but “like a lead balloon” is the cliche that comes to mind.

As far as I can recall, I’ve always voted in presidential elections, even when I didn’t like either candidate. And I probably voted in other elections periodically, but not as faithfully. To tell you the truth, after attending a political rally as part of a political science class in college, I was so turned off by the political party system that I changed my major to English.

I say that to emphasize that I think I understand how the common man feels about politics in general. Let’s see if I can sum this up accurately. The people in Washington are all crooks, and they don’t care what we think or how we feel.

They don’t mind taking more and more of our money, which they spend recklessly, and still run the federal debt up beyond our ability to comprehend. They don’t even obey the Constitution, much less live by biblical principles. No matter what they say, we can’t believe them. And state and local politicians aren’t always much better.

Is that how you feel? While I don’t believe it’s true of every elected official, I think we’ve seen far too much evidence of the validity of these complaints and many others as well.  For all intents and purposes, it appears that too many politicians view their offices as a permanent position–permanent as long as they can keep them. A career. And it seems they’re not afraid we’ll vote them out.

And why don’t we? Is it because we feel the situation is hopeless? Is it because worthier candidates are non-existent? Is it because even the candidates who talked a good talk to get elected have let us down completely–time after time after time?

If those things bother you the way they bother me, and especially if they keep you from voting, here are some things  to consider. The 2016 election will affect America’s future as no other election has ever done. We have the chance to turn this nation around. If we fail to, America may very well end up a third world nation. If not that, we could continue to lose our rights–freedom of speech, freedom of religion, the right to bear arms–all in the name of political correctness.

What Washington needs, no matter who runs and no matter who wins the election, is changed hearts and changed lives. That’s the business God is in.  But we still need to put the right people in office.

I urge you to research the candidates–and don’t trust the media for the information you need. A vast majority of the main media sources are in the pockets of the current administration, and you won’t hear the truth from them. But there are other sources…more objective sources.

I can’t tell you who to vote for, although I could be tempted to tell you who I definitely won’t vote for. But the freedom to choose is yours, and I wouldn’t do anything to deny you that right. If you do your best to dig through the political landfill dump and make the best informed decisions you can–and then vote–I’ll be satisfied.

Sorry if I got a little wordy today, but this subject is important to me, and it’s something I can’t remain silent about. Not when so many Americans don’t vote. Please share a comment…whether you agree or disagree. As long as you do it politely and respectfully.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Wednesday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

Growing More Conservative (Part Two)

Politics and religion are two other areas in which I’ve grown more conservative over the years.

I once wanted to be a high school civics teacher. I gave that idea up after attending my first political rally.

I’ve never lost my belief in or my appreciation for the Constitution, though. The older I get, the more I see its values being trampled at every level of government–from the Presidency down. The founders of this nation knew what they were doing, and they abided by the laws they’d established. They knew what would happen if the Constitution was ignored. I can only picture their tears of outrage if they were alive today to see how far we’ve fallen.

I used to be more moderate in my Christian beliefs. Although I’ve always believed that a true Christian should accept certain basic doctrines–the virgin birth, Jesus’ miracles, His death and resurrection, and His ascension back into Heaven–other things seemed less important

Like whether God created the world in seven earthly days or seven periods of time. And whether He created Adam outright or used evolution to build up to the first “real” man. And whether some biblical teachings related only to the culture of the day and not to today.

I’ve been sliding slowly but surely further into the conservative camp on those issues, too. If the Bible is true–and I believe it is–it must be accepted as true from cover to cover. No one has the ability to say that we should obey this, but ignore that.

So when Christ said that He was the Way, the Truth, and the Life–the only door to God–He was saying that Christianity is the only true religion. I believe Jesus’ claim, and that makes me uber-conservative. So I have no choice but to reject the claim that all religions are equal.

If you want to comment about this post, please do so respectfully. God loves us even when we disagree with Him.

<>

I’ll be back again on Wednesday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

“On Aging Gracelessly” is only one of my two blogs. I post lyrics of the Christian songs I’ve written over the last fifty years on  “As I Come Singing.” Check it out HERE if you’re interested.  Free lead sheets (tune, words, and chords) are available for many of them. View the list HERE.

If you enjoy my writing, you’ll find a number of things to read on my website.  Also music to listen to and music-related videos to watch.

My newest novel, The Devil and Pastor Gus, is available online at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Go HERE for links to those places.
Tentative-Front-Cover
Best regards,
Roger