The First Rain and the First Rainbow

Okay. I admit it. Writing about rain on a nasty snowy/winter mix day is a little strange, but it’s what came to mind this morning.

I’ve always been told that the forty-day rain–the rain that caused the “Great Flood” that Noah and his family (and two of all living creatures) were the only survivors of–was the first time earth had ever received rain. While I didn’t question that “fact,” I couldn’t keep from marveling at it. How could I be sure that was correct?

If you read the Creation story in the Bible, you won’t see any references to rain. Certainly the Garden of Eden had to have had a source of water to maintain its unimaginable lushness. But I’ve always pictured Eden as the world’s first rain forest–perhaps huge terrarium would be a more accurate description since it was a perfectly maintained ecosystem.

Situated between four major rivers, it undoubtedly had access to all the water it needed. Irrigated by underground springs? I couldn’t say.

But we still haven’t established whether rain fell on the earth before Noah’s day, although I can easily imagine his neighbors questioning why he was building a humongous boat in his backyard. Even if he planned to use it as a houseboat (which, of course, he ultimately did), how would he ever get it to the nearest body of water that was large enough to hold it?

(Picture the pond in the movie Second-Hand Lions after the two brothers bought a humongous yacht that took up almost the whole pond.)

The following picture is a life-size reproduction of the ark at the Ark Encounter.

I think the answer to my question about whether the flood rain was earth’s first rain can be found at the end of Noah’s story.

While Noah was standing there on a dry mountaintop, possibly watching the water down below receding, God created a rainbow and announced that it symbolized His promise never to destroy the earth again with water. So that must have been the first rainbow; how would “just another pretty rainbow” have been sufficiently special to be worthy of symbolizing God’s promise?

Although not every rain results in a visible rainbow, rainbows always exist when the circumstances are right–even if no one is in the right place to see them. So God’s rainbow must truly have been the first one, and the first rainbow would logically result from the earth’s first rain.

Whether or not you believe the biblical story of creation and the story of Noah’s flood–I believe both–I hope you’ll remember God’s promise the next time you see a rainbow. It’s a promise He’s made to all of us. How about leaving a comment?

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Thank You, Lord, for Making Me Who I Am

Dearest Heavenly Father, You know how much pleasure I get from thanking You for the many ways You’ve blessed me. The old hymn “Count Your Many Blessings” comes to mind, but so does the fact I couldn’t possibly name all of my blessings. In fact, some of them are things I don’t even know about.

But one thing I often thank you for–and now seems like a good time to do it–is for making me who I am.

You could’ve made me a girl. Thank You SO much for not doing that!

You could’ve had me born at any time in human history to any set of parents in any part of the world under any set of circumstances. But You allowed me to be born to a couple whose identity I will likely never know and adopted by Ben and Virginia Bruner. And You’ve kept me from having any great desire to waste time and money searching for my birth parents.

You placed me in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. While America was still great and in the process of becoming great again.

You didn’t make me handsome; You knew that would make me vain. But neither did You make me ugly or repulsive to look at. In spite of my physical weakness, I’m in no way disabled. And despite the number of conditions I take medicine for, I consider myself to be in reasonably good health. I don’t expect that to change today as I celebrate my seventy-second birthday.

You gave me intelligence. Not so much that I would abuse it, but enough to do the things You’ve wanted me to do. And You’ve given me creativity and writing skills. Not enough to be sidetracked by success, but enough to touch the people You’ve wanted my writings to touch.

That’s true of my music as well. You didn’t make me a good enough singer, guitarist, or song writer to succeed in ways You never intended, but You’ve allowed me to share my songs in churches, nursing homes, prisons, migrant camps and to sing on mission trips to Australia, England, Wales, Nicaragua, and Romania, where the blessings I received were undoubtedly far greater than the blessings I bestowed.

Even at seventy-two, I’m thankful that You are still helping me to grow in ways that please You. Jesus set a tough example to follow, but how blessed I am to be a member of Your Family and dedicated to trying to live the way You want me to live. And, no matter how much I enjoy life on earth, I’m even more thankful that I have eternity with You to look forward to. So, although I might be apprehensive of what the death process will be like, I’m blessed not to actually fear death itself.

Lord, I could just keep going. I could thank You that I’m not too tall or too short, that developing diabetes type 2 has motivated me to lose seventy pounds and to keep them off, and that remarriage has proven so much more wonderful than I could possibly have expected or asked for.

But let me conclude this prayer of thanks for making me who I am by thanking You for giving me the idea of sharing these thoughts with the people who read my blog posts.

What about you? Are you thankful for who God has made you to be? How about sharing a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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