Almost You’re Smiling

Since tomorrow is Christmas Day, I wanted to share one of my original songs with you. A Youtube video of me singing “Almost You’re Smiling” can be seen here.  A free lead sheet is available here.

If you’re like me, you’ve often wished you had been around two thousand years ago to witness Jesus’s life and ministry in person. But wishing doesn’t change the fact we were born two millennia too late.

Rather than fret about it, let’s imagine we were among the shepherds who saw and listened to the angels’ spectacular announcement of Jesus’s birth–no Super Bowl commercials could come close to matching it!–and have come to the stable, where we’re looking at Jesus as a newborn.

Hmm. No matter how special the angels said He was, He looks pretty much like any other baby, doesn’t He? Or does He look a little bit more peaceful than a regular baby as he lies there sleeping?

He opens His eyes. He appears to look first at you and then at me. Strange. Newborns aren’t able to focus that way, are they? More amazing still, He appears to be deep in thought. But babies can’t think yet; thought requires a knowledge of language, something  babies aren’t born with.

Of course, we know He’s both human and divine. So isn’t it possible He can observe things a normal baby can’t observe? And think or feel things babies shouldn’t be able to think or feel?  Alas, the Bible doesn’t tell us.

I speak to baby Jesus, aware that He shouldn’t be able to understand me. Yet He appears to be listening to my words. Perhaps even comprehending them. As if He might truly be more than just an ordinary baby. After all, fully human and fully divine is a strange and powerful combination. Not to mention a unique one.

Yes, Jesus is unique. Even so, I’m certain He won’t be able to answer my questions or comment about my observations. But I’ll ask and comment anyway.

“Little baby in a manger, almost You’re crying.
Can it be You feel the coldness of the world You’ve come to?
Do You somehow miss the warmth You’ve left at home in Heaven?
Little baby in a manger, almost You’re crying.

Do you see Yourself as just an ordinary baby,
Or do You somehow recognize that You’re the Son of God?

Little baby in a stable, almost You’re smiling.
Can it be You feel the joy of those who wait Your coming?
Do You somehow know what hope You’ve brought to earth from Heaven?
Little baby in a stable, almost You’re smiling.

Do you see Yourself as just an ordinary baby,
Or do You somehow recognize that You’re the Son of God?”

I don’t know how Jesus differed from ordinary babies while–at the same time–still being quite ordinary. It doesn’t  matter. Even as a baby, He deserved and deserves my praise and adoration–during the whole year. Not just at Christmas.

Please share a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

          

Links you might be interested in:

 

Advertisements

Life Matters–All Life

While I thoroughly agree with those who say that “black lives matter,” I prefer to take it one step further. A gigantic one. ALL LIFE MATTERS.

God is the giver of life, and He loves each of His human beings. Everyone is His favorite. He loves you as much as He loves me, and He loves me as much as He loves you. He loves the members of every race and nation equally. He even loves the world’s worst sinners as much as He loves His own Son. Some of you may disagree with that point, and I don’t blame you. But why would God the Father have sacrificed Jesus the Son for our sins if He didn’t love His human beings as much as John 3:16 says so beautifully:

“God loved the world so much that He gave up His only Son so that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have eternal life.” (Bruner “translation”)

Let’s take those ideas a step further. He also loves the unborn child as much as He loves the newborn. And He loves the baby–I refuse to place less importance on the unborn by saying “fetus”–who’s been cruelly aborted as much as he does the old person who dies of “natural causes.”

He created us all, and He made us all to be the people we’ve become and have yet to finish becoming.

Hmm. Those of us who weren’t murdered prior to birth, that is.

I don’t know the circumstances of my adoption, but I’m sure I could’ve been aborted if circumstances had permitted; but abortion wasn’t as readily available or as widely accepted in 1946. And my daughter, born to a single upper teen in 1987, could have been far more easily aborted.

People may not look at my daughter and me and question what the world would’ve been like had we not been born. It’s not something I think about, either. But I want to believe that our lives have made a difference to the people who’ve known us and sometimes even to people we don’t even realize our lives have touched.

I’ve read far too many times that America began its drastic decline with the Supreme Court’s legalization of abortion and the subsequent “sexual revolution,” which in turn brought about the need for increasingly more drastic forms of birth control.  I can’t argue with that opinion.

For thousands of years, the Bible has been the standard of human behavior. “Do not commit adultery” just as easily translates to “Do not commit any form of sexual sin,” heterosexual or homosexual. And “Do not commit murder” applies just as validly to murder of the unborn, who are alive and human from the moment of conception.

I’m afraid history books of the future will look back on the current era as the time time when biblical standards were totally dismissed as old-fashioned and inapplicable. Not to mention “inconvenient.”

But maybe it’s not too late. Let those of us who still believe in biblical standards “step up to the microphone” and make our voices heard. Without regard to the intolerance of those who oppose us.

Taking a stand isn’t always easy. But are you on my side? Can you say with me, “All life matters”? How about leaving a comment?

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger