The Creation Museum

[NOTE: If you’re interested in reading The Devil and Pastor Gus and posting an honest review on Amazon, please send a request to me at Roger@RogerBruner.com. I have a limited number of gift certificates for free Kindle copies.]

If you’ve been following my posts for the past week, you already know that I turned seventy on September 23 and enjoyed a long weekend visit to Kentucky to celebrate. On my actual birthday, we went to the Ark Encounter, which I wrote about this past Wednesday. The next day, we enjoyed a visit to the Creation Museum.

It’s easy to describe the Ark Encounter in a few words–“a life-sized replica of Noah’s ark”–but much more challenging to describe the Creation Museum briefly. Rather than try, let me quote from their website: “The state-of-the-art Creation Museum allows you to venture through biblical history, stunning exhibits, botanical gardens, planetarium, petting zoo, zip line adventure course, and much more. This 75,000-square-foot facility has welcomed over 2.5 million guests since opening in Petersburg, Kentucky.”

Both places are associated with Answers in Genesis, which “focuses on providing answers to questions about the Bible—particularly the book of Genesis—regarding key issues such as creation, evolution, science, and the age of the earth.”

The two facilities are just forty-five minutes apart in Kentucky.

The museum contains a number of dinosaur-related exhibits, including at least one that moves its head. You’ll also find a dinosaur skeleton, dinosaur fossils, and much more.

Why all the dinosaur exhibits?

Before attempting to answer that, let me explain that many Christians who believe the Bible is accurate and true in every aspect believe the earth is not millions of years old (as many scientists insist), but younger than 10,000 years. Although Bible-believing Christians–I hope there aren’t any other kind–believe God created everything in six days, they tend to disagree about whether those “days” were 24-hour days or six periods of time.

God, who presumably exists in dimensions other than ours, dimensions that somehow intersect with ours, could create a universe out of nothing. How could a cosmic explosion occur in nothingness and eventually come to be what we see as the universe? And how could that same explosion create simple life forms–life forms that would eventually become people after a long and elaborate process?

Things like the “big bang” and evolution just don’t make sense. Those concepts remind me of the popular joke about the scientist who told God he could create life from dust, too. God laughed and told him he would have to create his own dust first.

Back to dinosaurs.

Noah took two of every KIND of living creature on the ark. He didn’t have to take two of every SPECIES, though. As the animals were turned loose after the Great Flood receded and it was safe to come outside on dry land, they spread throughout the earth, adapting to whatever environment they ended up in, modifying (but not evolving) into different species. That was true of the other animals as well.

So dinosaurs–Noah didn’t need to take two of the big ones on the ark–played a key role in the Genesis story, even though they weren’t named specifically.

The Creation Museum is a biblical apologist’s dream. It helps to show that “intelligent design” is the only explanation that makes sense. And that evolution doesn’t make any sense at all.

Let me share just a few pictures now to give you a feel for what a visit to the Creation Museum is like. I couldn’t get these to go across the page the way I normally would, probably because of the caption beneath each one.

If you’re interested in seeing my photograpshs from the Creation Museum, go to the album on my Facebook page. I was going to post some of them here, but you almost need to see them all to get the full picture.

If you have questions or comments, I’m listening.

 

NOTE: Various people have complained about not being able to find or leave comments. Go all the way to the bottom of this post, beneath my “Best regards, Roger.” On the very bottom line of that last section just above the previous post you’ll see “Leave a Comment” if yours will be the first or “X Comments,” where  X denotes the number of existing comments.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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Encountering the Ark

Have you ever been driving down the road and seen a truck hauling a humongous yacht on its way to some fortunate buyer? Definitely a “wide load.”

dsc_2039You’ll never see a life-sized replica of Noah’s ark coming down the road, though. It’s FAR too huge. Better to build it in place, and that’s what the Answers in Genesis people did in Kentucky. And they built the Ark Encounter about forty-five minutes from their Creation Museum, which enables a single trip to Kentucky–about a ten-hour trip for us, including stops–to cover two extremely interesting and worthwhile visits.

arkbusThe parking lot at the Ark Encounter may not be as large as Disneyland’s, but it’s big. After buying tickets–we got ours online–visitors ride any of a number of buses to the site of the ark itself. What looked small at a distance looked humongous close up. Especially comparing it with the size of the people walking towards the entrance.

Every aspect of life aboard the ark has been carefully thought out and studied. Although the Bible doesn’t give specifics about how to cage and care for two of every kind of animal, how to provide food for what was then an unknown period of time, how to provide adequate lighting and air circulation inside–these are just some of the needs the designers of this ark had to figure out a reasonable solution for. One that would’ve been doable during biblical days.

A number of displays deal with the geological “proof” that the Great Flood actually happened, and evidence is presented to show that the earth is millions of years younger than most scientists believe. I can’t over-emphasize that the story of the ark is a study of how science and religion can work together when viewed from the proper perspective.

Let me share a few pictures and comments about the kinds of things visitors see at the Ark Encounter.

  • I said it’s big. It’s HUGE.

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  • Exhibits show the types of cages and pens that might have been used in Noah’s ark; a number show early species of various animal types:

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  • Various type of things needed to be stored on the ark: food (even food for picky eaters like koalas), lamp oil, water, and who knows what else

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  • Huge ramps connected the decks; the single door near the top had to be big enough to accommodate the largest animals

dsc_2077      dsc_2049      dsc_2087

  • The ark contains all kinds of exhibits

dsc_2123   dsc_2083   dsc_2066   inthebeginning

  • Life-sized exhibits of living quarters and of Noah and his family at work and prayer

blacksmithnoah   dsc_2125   dsc_2065

  • Separate from the ark itself is an amazing fast-food restaurant, a petting zoo, and camel and donkey rides

pettingzoo   dsc_2088   rogercamel

No way can I adequately represent the feel of visiting the Ark Encounter, but I hope these pictures will help you appreciate what a tremendous achievement this replica represents. And perhaps make you want to visit it yourself someday.

If you have questions about the ark or about anything else related to our trip, please leave a comment.

NOTE: Various people have complained about not being able to find or leave comments. Go all the way to the bottom of this post, beneath my “Best regards, Roger.” On the very bottom line of that last section just above the previous post you’ll see “Leave a Comment” if yours will be the first or “X Comments,” where  X denotes the number of existing comments.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

On Turning Seventy

birthdayphotoMy wife, Kathleen, knows that birthdays haven’t always been a time of joy to me. When I turned thirty and my father proudly announced it from the pulpit, he didn’t realize what a horrible thing I thought he’d done. That happened back during the days when the younger folks thought people became ancient at thirty. That’s what I’d believed until it happened to me!

Forty was less of a problem, though. I had finally ended up in a career I really liked and was good at. And at least I’d gotten used to being “over the hill.”

Fifty was horrible, though. For some crazy reason, I had it in my head I wasn’t going to live till my fiftieth birthday. In fact, I wrote a novel (not yet published) about a man who believed the same thing about himself. Thanks to friends in Australia, Keith and Maggie Long, who helped me celebrate that birthday a few months early with a homemade cake and a humongous CD package containing all of the songs the Seekers had ever recorded.

As you’ve probably gathered, I survived turning fifty. And sixty.

Seventy is a funny age, though. I don’t feel as if I’m really old. Yet I’m so aware of the various ways my body is wearing down or out and of a condition or two I’m really not certain what to do something about. But at least I’ve made it through two cataract surgeries and have decent sight now–because of astigmatism, I still have to wear glasses–and have new hearing aids and have quit having to asking everyone to repeat everything.

Much to be thankful for. Thank You, Lord. Bunches and bunches.

Kathleen wanted this to be a really special birthday. She got me a new Yamaha MX-49 keyboard for my home recording studio and suggested and arranged a long weekend visit to Kentucky to visit the Creation Museum and the Ark Encounter. I’ll give you a report on those two visits in upcoming posts.

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We’re staying at the First Farm Inn, a bed and breakfast that is just a couple of miles from the Creation Museum. It’s a horse farm, and we expect the rest of our visit to be just as pleasant as the first part.

firstfarminn     insidestable

I have to be honest. I’m writing this the evening of the 22nd; my birthday’s not actually until the 23rd. But I wanted to go ahead and write this while I was thinking about it.

Have any of your birthdays been extra special–either good or bad? How about sharing in a comment?

NOTE: Various people have complained about not being able to find or leave comments. Go all the way to the bottom of this post, beneath my “Best regards, Roger.” On the very bottom line of that last section just above the previous post you’ll see “Leave a Comment” if yours will be the first or “X Comments,” where  X denotes the number of existing comments.

~*~

Links you might be interested in:

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger