Praying for an Enemy

A month or two back, I posted my thoughts about “Jesus’s Toughest Commandment,” and that’s something I’m still thinking about. I’ve even assigned the task of praying for an enemy to the protagonist of my soon-to-be published novel, When Love Won’t Wait.

Here’s the relevant excerpt.

Ever since the previous month’s totally unproductive meeting about taking a simple, no-cost security measure—had any of my meetings with the Elders ever been productive?—I avoided Bro McKenny as much as possible.

Avoided? Yes. But that didn’t give me the freedom to pray against him the way Jerry Cruncher accused his wife of doing in A Tale of Two Cities.

Neither did it permit me to remain neutral. Since Jesus not only taught us to pray for our enemies, He set the perfect example not only by  praying for the soldiers crucifying Him, but by asking God to forgive them.

If I’d been in His position, I couldn’t have done that. But at least I recently felt compelled to start praying for Bro McKenny. And not just for God to soften his heart, but to make him more recognizable as a Christian.

So far, I hadn’t noted any changes. Why did God’s timetable have to differ so much from mine? Or had Bro simply been resisting the Holy Spirit?

Lord, forgive me. That’s exactly the wrong attitude on my part. Please forgive him for everything he’s said or done to me and help him in whatever ways he needs help. Thanks bunches. Amen!

If you read the previous article, you may recall that I’ve chosen to pray for someone I don’t know personally and will probably never meet. Someone who would probably have no interest in meeting me.

Yet I have too many reasons to consider her not just my enemy, but America’s.

The Bible advises us to be quick to listen and slow to speak. This woman appears to be slow to listen and quick to speak, and I can’t think of a single thing she’s said or done that I haven’t strongly disagreed with.

Knowing how to pray for her has proven to be very much like my character’s problem in praying for Bro McKenny.

I’m so tempted to say, “Lord, please stop her before she causes any more trouble.” Or “Please help her to grow up.” Or “Can’t You do something to make her a nicer person?”

And those things are “exactly the wrong attitude on my part.” It’s easy to pray that God will help me have a more loving attitude towards her, but–no matter how appropriate that is–it’s a prayer for me rather than for her.

What do I pray that doesn’t simply reflect my disapproval of her?

Would it be appropriate to pray, “Lord, you know her. Please help her to become the person You want her to become…”? Perhaps. But what do I pray after that? “Not my will but Yours” is always an appropriate ending, yet it leaves me feeling that I haven’t truly prayed for this individual.

I believe one purpose of prayer is to more closely align our attitudes with God’s will. God loves this lady–just as much as He loves you and me. It probably grieves Him to see the way she typically behaves.

After several months of trying to pray the best way for her, I can’t say she appears to be any “better.”

But do you know what? I’m not so quick to look at the news for another article about her shortcomings. And when I see one, I wonder what has made her the way she is.

This problem is something I go back and forth on, and I would honestly appreciate your suggestions about the best way to pray for her. Thank you in advance for leaving a comment.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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