déjà vu

Many years ago, my first wife and I bought a miniature dachshund. Although we put “Cinnamon Lady” on the AKC form as the desired name, the approval came back with a “19th” added. That didn’t matter, anyhow. We were already calling her Cindy.

Cindy was beautiful and sweet, but quite stubborn when it came to housebreaking.  I still have a mental image of taking her outside in the snow. And of her giving me a “you don’t really expect me to do anything out here in this cold wet mess, do you” look.

For a while, we also had a ferret. Although he stayed in a cage most of the time, we let him out to play. It was great fun watching Cindy pull him across the living room by the tail.

But one day we got home from work to find Cindy paralyzed; she couldn’t walk. Apparently she’d fallen off the top of the sofa, a favorite snooze-site. Our local vet could establish that she had some ruptured disks, but he didn’t do that kind of surgery. We would need to carry her across the Chesapeake Bay Bridge to a proper surgical vet.

For a cost of $800-900, he would operate. But he couldn’t guarantee that the surgery would restore Cindy’s mobility. We had just gotten an unexpected check for a thousand dollars. Even though I’d planned to buy our first computer with that money, we decided to give Cindy a new chance at life.

Not only did that operation restore Cindy’s mobility, it have us additional years of pleasure with her. Only when she started snapping at our young daughter did we realize she was in pain. We decided to have her put to sleep.

Fast forward twenty or thirty years. Kathleen and I bought a miniature dachshund. We named her Happy, and was that name ever appropriate.

To avoid a déjà vu experience, we haven’t let her lie on top of the sofa.

Nonetheless, just a week or two ago, Happy wasn’t putting any weight on her left rear leg. The vet gave us an anti-inflammatory and a muscle relaxer. In the event the problem was a fatty deposit. But she reluctantly admitted the problem was apt to be a slipped disk or cancer.

The tests needed to evaluate those possibilities would cost $2000. No telling what surgery would cost. We couldn’t justify dipping that far into our emergency fund.

We’ve been giving her the medicine faithfully and doing our best to keep her from jumping up on the sofa or down from the sofa or the bed. She seems to be doing a little better. Although she still favors that leg, I’m not sure that she’s actually in pain.

We wouldn’t have any problem with her not getting better–as long as she doesn’t get worse again after she finishes with the medicines.

Nonetheless, this is definitely a déjà vu time.

Your comments are welcome. So are your prayers.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

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2 thoughts on “déjà vu

  1. I’ve gone through two dachshunds who had to have back surgery (best results are achieved right after injury or paralization)
    Very expensive. Maybe rescues can give you names of surgeons who won’t charge as much.
    Recommendations: put ramps everywhere ❗️ Off the deck, by the bed, sofa, favorite chair etc etc. teach the dog to go up AND down the ramps is VERY important ❗️ Use small treats to teach, like Cheerios etc ..
    NO STEPS ❗️ When dog has problems with a leg, confine as much as you can, so that it has time to heal ❗️ No jumping, no steps ❗️ No running or walks ❗️Carry outside, down steps etc.
    Give Glucosamine every day. They make small treats my Doxie loves ❗️
    Good luck and

    Like

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