The Newest “Pet” — Revisited

A year-and-a-half ago, I published “The Newest ‘Pet'” included below. We still love our Roomba. No complaints whatsoever, and lots of praise.

I recently received a message from someone who had read the original blog post and offered me a link to an online review of robot vacuum cleaners. It was a great review, and the study seemed to have been conducted sufficiently scientifically to be accurate and worthwhile.

I won’t try to summarize it–I couldn’t do it justice–but the link is here. If you’re considering a robot vacuum cleaner–or simply want to see how yours stacks up against the competition–you’ll find the review to be informative and well done.

Reading my original blog post is optional. *G*

 

Roomba   Roomba2

My wife and I recently spent a wonderful week with my daughter and her family in Florida. This was an exciting time for all of us. They have a new baby (their second child), a new house (their first), and an actual bed for us to sleep in rather than an air mattress on the living room floor. Oh, and did I mention that the new house, like so many in that part of Florida, has a pool?

But they had something else that caught my attention.

I was sitting in the living room working on email when I heard a low roaring sound coming from another room. When I glanced beyond the doorway, I spotted a thirteen-inch (diameter) round gadget moving from place to place on the floor. At one time it moved directly along the base of a wall. At other times it moved away diagonally and sometimes at a ninety-degree angle towards the other side of the room.

Although it seemed to be happy with the bare floor, it soon took an interest in the dining room, which is carpeted. Here’s a video I took in the hallway.

What in the world was this crazy spinning gadget? It obviously was NOT one of Robert Austin’s (the four-year-old) toys, but it was unlike anything I’d ever seen before.

Hmm. This critter seemed to be eating dirt off the floor and carpet. A vacuum cleaner? A human-less vacuum cleaner? So it appeared to be.

I grabbed the camcorder and followed it around for a minute or two, occasionally moving out of its unpredictable path. When I got brave enough, I remained in its way one time to see what it would do.

When this robot vacuum cleaner determined that it couldn’t climb over my shoe, it worked its way around it. I could only shake my head in amazement. I’d heard of robot vacuum cleaners, but had never believed they could possibly be worth the investment.

You have to understand that I’m the guy who went to Target and bought the next-to-the-least expensive human-operated vacuum there and faithfully uses it once every two to three weeks, whether the carpet needs it or not.

Uh, I must be honest here. It always needs it.

Our week-long visit gave me plenty of chances to observe my daughter’s robot cleaner. She had it on a day-and-time schedule; I believe it ran every day. I wouldn’t be surprised, since I never saw one speck of dirt on floor or carpet during our visit. And that’s in a house with a four-year-old!

Oh, and did I mention that this little critter is smart enough to know when it’s finished and return to its charger base? The thing also has enough sense to back onto its base.

Boy, did that get me thinking. It normally takes me about an hour to vacuum our place. And that’s not counting cleaning the filter and emptying the whatever-you-call-it-where-the-dirt-goes-when-a-vacuum-is-bagless.

My wife and I discuss even some small purchases, and a robot like this–not the highest priced Roomba–would need a LOT of discussion. But I sowed the seed by showing great interest in the robot and complaining about my inability–okay, my unwillingness–to keep up with vacuuming as much as it’s needed.

When we got home, we barely talked about it. But by the end of the week we’d determined that the line item we have in the budget for home-related stuff could cover that purchase. Especially since we had a 20% Bed, Bath, & Beyond coupon that could be used on this model. (It specifically excluded the more expensive models.)

I’m not sure why my wife was so agreeable to the purchase. Maybe she was just tired of waiting for me to vacuum. No matter what her motivation, however, I think she’s as thrilled with our new “pet” as I am.

Has some type of gadget attracted you so much that you considered getting it, even though it wasn’t an absolute necessity? Or are you still trying to justify such a purchase? How about sharing?

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

        

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A Perspective on History

When I was a kid, I sometimes played Civil War in the marshy area near my home. I’d lived in Virginia and North Carolina all but the first few months of my life, so of course I pretended to be a Confederate soldier. What else could I have been? Certainly not a Yankee!

I suppose I should be embarrassed about those memories. But at least I never would’ve approved of slavery or the mistreatment of any group of people. Growing up in a Christian home, I’ve always done my best to view (and treat) everyone equally, and I’ve liked or disliked specific people for who they are as individuals, not what group they’re a part of.

America is suffering enough diverseness without glorifying  the tragic conflict between the North and the South.  No Confederate flags on my car or my house. Even though I have some genuine Confederate money, it’s in a drawer somewhere. Out of sight because it’s not relevant to my outlook .

Nonetheless, history is still history. Removing or destroying statues related to the War Between the States doesn’t change history or make the bad from the past go away. Not anymore than doing away with a Holocaust museum would bring back the millions of Jews Hitler put to death.

I’m thankful that Richmond’s Confederate statues on Monument Avenue are still in place. And intact. When I look at them again, as I did a couple of weeks ago, I think only of the fact that those men stood for what they believed was right. Not because I agree with them.

The Civil War happened, and it needs to be remembered. Perhaps memories of that event will help to prevent a future civil war.

I’m especially pleased that Richmond’s Museum of the Confederacy is now the Civil War Museum . I think that change helps to put history into a more realistic perspective without making any effort to alter or to glorify it.

What do you think? Please leave a comment.

 

         

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I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

A Challenging Thought

As the son of a Baptist minister, I grew up knowing and believing in God, and I always believed in Jesus’s divinity.

I’ll never forget something I used to think about during my childhood. Something so unanswerable that it never failed to challenge and boost my childish faith. I don’t recall when or how I started thinking about this, but my thought went something like this:

God is everywhere, and He’s made everything–the world and everything in it. He’s eternal. He has no beginning and no end. But where did God come from? Who made God? How can He have just always been? Nothing can come from nothing.

Some children–and many adults–would probably use a thought like that to dismiss the possibility of the existence of God.

Not me, though. No matter what a puzzle that was–an unanswerable question, an unsolvable mystery–that simply made me appreciate God all the more.

I’ve since read a little book called Your God Is Too Small.  Not my God, though. He was and still is too big for me to begin to understand. How could I worship Him if He was comprehensible to mere human beings?

 Now that I’m older–seventy-one–I find myself enjoying that childhood puzzle all over again. Now, however, I also ask a similar question about the Big Bang theory: how can something like our universe and everything in it have come from nothing unless a Greater Power–the God of the Universe–was responsible?

Impossible!

The last few years have brought a new thought to mind, one I’d love to write a novel about but which I know I’m incapable of doing justice to. Just writing it would require greater knowledge than any human being has been blessed with.

What if our world–the whole universe as we know it–exists within the mind of God? What if He created us in His infinitely creative and loving mind rather than as actual beings in what in God’s world would be physical?

Weird thought? Perhaps.

Do I believe it? No matter how much sense it makes to me–having the history of the world unfold within God’s thoughts rather than in what we think of as the world–I can’t say that I actually believe it.

Nonetheless, that’s one way of looking at Him as not being too small. And being infinitely bigger than I can imagine.

If thoughts like those help me to appreciate God more, then I’ll continue to enjoy them. He’s worthy of my best thoughts–my biggest thoughts–no matter how unconventional.

Please leave a comment.

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

                

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Decorations – Now or Ever?

I don’t know what the stores are like where you live, but the ones at the mall down the road from us started decorating for Christmas before Halloween.

And not just decorating. Penny’s has a number of Christmas-themed products occupying prominent places on major aisles. Presents for pets. Santa-themed sleepwear. You name it, they’ve probably got it.

          

I suppose I shouldn’t be shocked at seeing the decorating starting so early. Not when it’s been this way longer than I can remember.

The decorating is really ramping up now. The mall has placed two trees at the ends of mostly empty hallways. Soon they’ll hang the huge fresh-looking wreaths that require special equipment to reach high enough to put them in place. Santa’s chair and the related setting just appeared a day or two ago.

With “Black Friday” coming this week, I can understand the need to get everything ready for all the Christmas shoppers. This is the one time of year our mall doesn’t look dead.

I can recall helping decorate the Christmas tree when I was still living at home. My parents were very particular. I wasn’t to simply throw the icicles over the branches, but to drape them carefully, one by one. How tedious!

But also how effective. The extra care showed.

And that was in the days when the Christmas tree lights were a real pain. Some of you may recall the times when a strand wouldn’t light if one bulb had burned out. Think National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation.

I’m not interested in doing much decorating now. Fortunately, neither is my wife.

Back when we had two cats–even when we got down to one–there was no way to safely have a Christmas tree on the floor. So we downsized from a nice pre-decorated tree to one we could put on the dining room table. We tried a Norfolk Island pine several years, but since we always managed to kill them eventually, we switched to a reusable tabletop-sized artificial tree.

It got in the way. Too many presents, I suppose. So now we don’t have  a tree at all. Kathleen puts up a few decorations every year, but nothing elaborate.

People might accuse us of being Scrooges, but I say, “Bah! Humbug!” to that accusation.

Christmas is the celebration of Christ’s birth. That’s the only thing that matters. And we don’t need decorations to do that.

Besides that, nothing can ever begin to match the original Bethlehem star.

Your comments are welcome.

I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

          

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Constitutional Amendments I’d Like to See

I believe in the Constitution of the United States. I don’t think it’s outdated, but I think it could use some additions and clarifications.

Fortunately, the Constitution’s framers provided a means for the States not simply to suggest further amendments, but to make them. Gathering a Convention of States for that purpose is a long, tedious process, but a large number of concerned citizens are attempting to do that now.

I haven’t paid as much attention to their news as I might have done, but I believe their proposed amendments are good and necessary. I’m not going to talk about their proposed amendments as such, even though some of mine overlap with theirs.

Let’s start with a requirement that Congress pass a balanced budget every year. We’ve all heard horrendous stories about the way the Federal government wastes money. And I believe billions of dollars are spent by the Federal government on areas the Constitution doesn’t give it the authority to be involved in. Many of them–education, for example–should be strictly within the hands of the States.

Oh, and let’s set term limits–the total number of years–senators and congressmen can serve in public office. No one should be permitted to make a career of staying in office. That’s probably a big factor in why the swamp in Washington needs to be drained. And why it’s so difficult to do.

And what about those Supreme Court justices who have more power than Congress, even though the framers of the Constitution intended for the judicial branch of the government to be the weakest branch? And it’s almost impossible to remove a justice. Their power needs to be limited, and perhaps they should be given term limits as well.

I don’t know whether they should be elected, but it’s a thought. Of course, if their power was properly limited, that probably wouldn’t be as much of an issue.

I don’t have an answer for the immigration problem, but if I were someone who’d worked hard to gain legal entry into the United States and did so because I loved what America stands for and studied and and passed the test to become an American citizen,  I would be highly upset at the influx of illegals, many of whom don’t want to blend in with the rest of us.  Maybe we can’t force them to change their attitudes, but the Constitution could  be amended to make English the official–the ONLY official language–of America.

I’m not out to make people forget their former cultures, just to make English-speaking Americans out of them. And not bow down to their anti-American attitudes while enjoying America’s privileges.

And while I’m at it, how about an amendment clarifying that the First Amendment doesn’t outlaw religion in government? It only says that the government can’t establish a state religion.

Hmm. I thought I was done, but one more thought has come to mind. Maybe the Constitution can’t be amended simply to outlaw political correctness, but how about an amendment clarifying that what a person says isn’t illegal simply because someone else doesn’t want to hear it? Is it possible to even legislate offensiveness without that legislation itself being offensive?

I think that’s it. But what about you? Do you have other amendments you’d like to see? Or do you disagree with any of mine? Comments are welcome as long as they’re made respectfully.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

    

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My Way…or His Way?

Some of you may be old enough to remember singer Frank Sinatra and the song “My Way.” I wasn’t a Sinatra fan, and that’s probably the only song of his I paid any attention to. Although he didn’t write the lyrics, they clearly represent his attitude and were apparently written specifically for him.

I can’t legally quote the lyrics–you can read them here–but he lived his life the way he chose. Yes, he had a few regrets, and he had his ups and downs. He didn’t claim that his life had been trouble-free, but he was proud of doing things his way and saying what he considered genuine and “not the words of one who kneels.”

I don’t know if Mr. Sinatra was a Christian, but I take his scoffing at “the words of one who kneels” as a suggestion that he was so self-dependent he didn’t feel the need to pray. Or to depend on God.

God gave each of us strengths to do as much as we can on our own, but He also allowed each of us to have enough weaknesses to keep us humble. Christians recognize their need for God’s help. Day in and day out. Moment by moment. We know where our strength comes from.

I have a few regrets, too, and most of them have resulted from doing–or attempting to do–things “my way” rather than “God’s Way.” Regrets like those could easily result in guilt.

But they don’t have to.

God is merciful and forgiving when we turn to Him in repentance.  How thankful I am that my regrets don’t bog me down unnecessarily. I can’t change the past, but I can certainly learn from it and continually strive to do better as I attempt to follow God’s Way more closely each and every day.

Frank Sinatra may be remembered as someone who did things his way. I’d rather be remembered as someone who at least tried to live his life God’s Way.

Whose way do you live your life? Your comments are welcome.

I’ll be back again next Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger

    

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A Thought-Provoking Incident

One day this past week I went to the mall a little before 8:30 a.m. for my usual morning walk. But what happened when I got there wasn’t anything I could ever have anticiated.

I saw a crowd of other walkers going inside–they don’t unlock the doors until 8:30–but when I reached the door, it was locked. I checked the other doors. All locked.

One of the walkers inside saw me and pushed the door open for me, and I held it open for two ladies who were coming behind me. Why were the doors still locked when someone–presumably the security guard–had obviously let everyone else in?

I was immediately informed that the security guard had fallen–or at least she was lying immobile–on the floor just fifteen or twenty feet inside the Food Court entrance. Somebody was frantically requesting that someone with a phone call 911. Apparently someone did.

I don’t know what I expected, but the walkers–there must’ve been fifteen or twenty of us–were all standing around at a respectful distance. I don’t think anyone was talking, and I don’t believe anyone bypassed the crowd to walk. One lady was rubbing the female security guard’s back…as if to sooth her. I couldn’t see any indication that the guard was even conscious, however. (See the P.S. below.)

At 8:38 one of the custodians came in from outside and announced that we would all need to leave. The management couldn’t allow us to walk without having a security guard on duty. As we filed out–I didn’t hear anyone complaining–the ambulance arrived.

I don’t know if the security guard is okay now or even alive. But I’d be willing to bet I wasn’t the only person in the crowd who was praying silently for her. And continuing to pray for her now–several days later.

Earlier this morning I was looking for the song I wanted to post on my “As I Come Singing” blog this coming Wednesday, and I decided to use one whose lyrics, based on Isaiah 40: 6-8, say:

The grass will soon wither,
And the flowers will soon fade;
So the strongest of men will soon weaken and die.

Only the Word of the Lord lasts forever;
And one Word from Him gives us eternal life.
One Word from Him gives us eternal life.

I started thinking about the security guard again. I hate to keep referring to her that way, but even though I always spoke to her, I didn’t really know her…not even her name. She didn’t appear to be anywhere close to middle age. I knew and still know nothing about her but her function at the mall.

And now I don’t know whether she’s still alive. Or whether she’s become a withered blade of grass or a faded flower.

Something to ponder as I thank God for my hope of eternal life through faith in His Son, Jesus Christ.

Your comments are welcome.

 P.S.  I saw the young lady several days after writing the rest of this blog post. She’s twenty-five, pregnant with her first child, and doing all right medically, although she does have another doctor’s appointment this week. The problem she’d experienced was a combination of low blood pressure and low blood sugar–with no explanation of why.  Although I still didn’t learn her name, I was thankful for the opportunity not simply to get the update, but to express my concern for her.

 

    

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I’ll be back again on Sunday. If you’d like to receive my posts by email, go to “Follow Blog via Email” at the upper right.

Best regards,
Roger